Archive for June, 2013

The Start of the Battle of the Somme – 1 July 1916

Posted on June 30th, 2013 by The British Newspaper Archive

The Somme Offensive commenced on 1 July 1916, as Allied forces attacked German positions by the River Somme on the Western Front in France. On the opening day of the battle, the British suffered 60,000 casualties – making it the worst day in the history of the British army. Here is an upbeat newspaper report of […]

Bottle and Cushion Throwing at Wimbledon – July 1935

Posted on June 28th, 2013 by The British Newspaper Archive

It seems that the crowd at Wimbledon hasn’t always been as well-behaved as they appear to be now. For in this newspaper story from July 1935, it’s reported that impatient spectators rained bottles and cushions down on to the court when the secretary of the All-England Club, a hapless Mr. D.R. Larcombe, attemped to calm […]

The Opening of Tower Bridge – London, 30 June 1894

Posted on June 28th, 2013 by The British Newspaper Archive

London had one of those ‘Earth hath not anything to show more fair…’ moments on 30 June 1894, when Tower Bridge was opened by the Prince of Wales (the future Edward VII). To celebrate that historic day, we’ve created a gallery of illustrations of the famous bridge. The Graphic – Saturday 07 July 1894 Image […]

Assassination Attempt on Rasputin – 29 June 1914

Posted on June 28th, 2013 by The British Newspaper Archive

On 29 June 1914, Khioniya Guseva attempted to assassinate Grigori Rasputin in the monk’s home village of Pokrovskoe Selo in western Siberia. Although the facts of the attaack are unclear, it’s said that Guseva stabbed Rasputin either as he left church or while he was reading a telegram outside the post office. Althought Guseva’s attempt […]

The Assassination of Archduke Francis Ferdinand and Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg – 28 June 1914

Posted on June 27th, 2013 by The British Newspaper Archive

In Sarajevo on 28 June 1914, Archduke Francis Ferdinand and Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, were shot dead by the 19-year-old student, Gavrilo Princip. It was the assassination of Archduke Francis Ferdinand, the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, that led to the outbreak of World War One. To mark this tragic day in world history, here […]

Helen Keller – Born on 27 June 1880

Posted on June 26th, 2013 by The British Newspaper Archive

‘After all, seeing, like poetry, is the soul’s prerogative’ – Helen Keller Helen Adams Keller, the writer, political activist and lecturer, was born in Tuscumbia, Alabama, on 27 June 1880. We’ve been reading stories about Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan in the Archive, and almost every story moves us with the amazing manner in which […]

The Death of King George IV – 26 June 1830

Posted on June 25th, 2013 by The British Newspaper Archive

On 26 June 1830, King George IV (perhaps better known as the Prince Regent) passed away at Windsor Castle, aged 67. Known as ‘the first gentleman of England’, we thought we’d mark the day by posting two, contemporary newspaper stories that report on the death of George IV. Freeman’s Journal – Monday 28 June 1830 […]

Found in The British Newspaper Archive – Animals dressed in clothes . . .

Posted on June 25th, 2013 by The British Newspaper Archive

From roller-skating chimpanzees in top hats and dogs dressed as clowns to aristo-cats in customised prams, dressing up our pets in people’s clothes has long been an endearingly eccentric trait of some animal lovers in the UK. As you can imagine, The Archive contains some wonderful photos and colourful stories that capture this desire to […]

The Postponed Coronation and Appendix Operation of King Edward VII – 24 June 1902

Posted on June 23rd, 2013 by The British Newspaper Archive

On 24 June 1902, and two days before his coronation, King Edward VII (aka ‘Bertie) was diagnosed with appendicitis and underwent an emergency operation. Thankfully, the operation was a complete success and the king was smoking cigars in his bed the following day – although the coronation had to be postponed and did not take […]