The story of the 1914 Christmas Truce, as reported by WW1 newspapers

Posted on December 19th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Kate ColeAfter watching Sainsbury’s Christmas advert, Kate Cole was inspired to research the real story behind WW1’s Christmas Truce.

She used The British Newspaper Archive to unearth the experiences of soldiers on the Western Front in 1914.

 

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In December 1914, during first year of World War One, a remarkable event known as the Christmas Day Truce occurred in small pockets along the Western Front. 100 years later, one of Britain’s largest grocery shops has released a Christmas advert re-enacting the famous truce.

With the Sainsbury’s advert appearing on my television virtually every day since mid-November, I decided to do my own research into the Christmas Truce to determine what actually happened. I have done this by using the many local and national newspapers that have been digitally preserved by the excellent British Newspaper Archive.

Attempts to secure an official Christmas truce in 1914

Throughout the length and breadth of Britain, newspapers reported Pope Benedict XV’s attempts to secure a 12-hour Christmas truce on all sides. By 11 December 1914, it was thought that Germany was willing to have a truce.
 
The Birmingham Daily Mail reported that the Pope's attempts to secure a Christmas Truce in 1914 looked favourable.
 
Birmingham Daily Mail – Friday 11 December 1914
Image © Trinity Mirror. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

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Just a few days later, newspapers including the Exeter and Plymouth Gazette were reporting that the Pope’s attempt had failed. While the article below mentions that Russia had refused the truce, it’s interesting that of the many reports I’ve read from the beginning of December, none directly confronted Russia for opposing the truce.

Only one newspaper mentioned the (glaringly obvious) reason behind Russia’s refusal –that the date of Christmas in the Orthodox Church was not the same as that observed in the Roman Church. The absence of a reason in the majority of reports is unwitting testimony, showing that the Allies didn’t always see eye-to-eye on matters of the war.
 
The Exeter and Plymouth Gazette reported that the Pope's attempt to secure a Christmas Truce in 1914 failed.
 
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette – Monday 14 December 1914
Image © Local World Limited. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

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Newspapers printed British soldiers’ Christmas Truce reports

By Wednesday 30 December, the story of the unofficial Christmas Day Truce started to reach Britain. Soldiers’ letters to their loved ones arrived and were often sent to local newspapers, then filtering through to other local and national newspapers.

You’ll find a selection of the images and reports I’ve found about Christmas in the trenches in 1914 below. The stories vary in detail, showing that the Christmas Truce was not uniform with a set beginning and end.
 
The Daily Mirror printed a photo from the Christmas Truce in 1914.
 
Daily Mirror – Friday 08 January 1915
Image © Trinity Mirror. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page
 
A soldier's letter from the Western Front, describing the 1914 Christmas Truce, was printed in the Gloucester Journal
 
Gloucester Journal – Saturday 02 January 1915
Image © Local World Limited. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page
 
An illustration of the 1914 Christmas Day Truce was printed in the Nottingham Evening Post
 
Nottingham Evening Post – Saturday 02 January 1915
Image © Local World Limited. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page
 
A report about the WW1 Christmas Truce, published in the Liverpool Daily Post
 
Liverpool Daily Post – Thursday 31 December 1914
Image © Trinity Mirror. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page
 
This report about World War One's Christmas Day Truce was published in the Aberdeen Journal.
 
Aberdeen Journal – Friday 01 January 1915
Image © D.C.Thomson & Co. Ltd. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page

 

Each sector of the Western Front seem to have had their own version – some only allowing the burial of the dead on Christmas morning before hostilities began again, while others continued their truce though the entire festive period.

Some reports also mention that football matches occurred during the Christmas Truce. A soldier’s letter printed in the Gloucester Journal stated that ‘higher up the line – you would scarcely believe it – but they were kicking a football about between the trenches’.

The Christmas Truce was a remarkable World War One event. Even though the Pope was not successful in arranging a formal truce, the soldiers themselves achieved what generals, politicians and religious leaders could not.

 

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Visit Kate’s blog, Essex Voices Past, to read more of her historical research.

 

Join us for a week of prize giveaways, starting on Saturday 27 December

Posted on December 18th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Giveaway week at The British Newspaper ArchiveWe’ll be giving away some fantastic prizes and celebrating the different types of research our newspapers can help with next week.

Simply check The British Newspaper Archive’s Facebook page at 12pm (GMT) every day from Saturday 27 December – Friday 2 January to take part.

 

Visit The British Newspaper Archive’s Facebook page

 

Win some great prizes with The British Newspaper Archive

There are lots of exciting gifts on offer, whether you’re interested in genealogy, local history, studying World War One, the history of sport, crime research, women’s history or something completely different.

It doesn’t matter where you live; our week of competitions is open to everyone. Take a look at what you could win on our Facebook page each day:

 

Saturday 27 December – Family history

 

Sunday 28 December – Local history

  • £50 voucher to spend on books from The History Press, including their local history titles.
  • English Heritage edition of Monopoly, worth £29.99.

 

Monday 29 December – Sports history

  • Bicycle Design: An Illustrated History by Tony Hadland and Hans-erhard Lessing, worth £24.95.
  • The Final Over: The Cricketers of Summer 1914 by Christopher Sandford, worth £18.99.
  • Beastly Fury: The Strange Birth of British Football by Richard Sanders, worth £9.99.

 

Tuesday 30 December – Crime research

  • 1 month subscription to Findmypast which will let you explore their Crime, Prisons & Punishment records, worth £9.95.
  • Beggars, Cheats and Forgers: A History of Frauds Through the Ages by David Thomas, worth £12.99.
  • The Complete Jack the Ripper by Donald Rumbelow, worth £9.99.

 

Wednesday 31 December – World War One research

 

Thursday 1 January – Women’s history

  • £50 voucher to spend on books from The History Press, including their women’s history titles.
  • Votes for Women playing cards, worth £5.
  • Votes for Women pin badge, worth £4.99.

 

Friday 2 January – Tell us what you’re researching

 

Visit The British Newspaper Archive’s Facebook page

 

230,000 newspaper pages added from 1765-1953

Posted on December 15th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Thousands of historical newspaper pages were added to The British Newspaper Archive in November, including 19 brand new titles. We hope you enjoy exploring these additions.
 
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19 new titles, including the Aberdeen Weekly Journal

You’ll now find editions of the Aberdeen Weekly Journal and the County Chronicle, Surrey Herald and Weekly Advertiser for Kent online, as well as 17 extra Irish titles.

45 other titles were also updated, including the Newry Examiner and Louth Advertiser, Northampton Mercury and Salisbury and Winchester Journal. A full list of recent additions is provided below.
 
Search old newspaper copies of the Aberdeen Journal

 

Aberdeen People’s Journal – 1891, 1894, 1896 – 1897

Aberdeen Weekly Journal – 1915 – 1919, 1939 – 1945

Advocate: or, Irish Industrial Journal – 1856 – 1860

Athlone Sentinel – 1834

Bedfordshire Times and Independent – 1951

Belfast Mercantile Register and Weekly Advertiser – 1840 – 1841

Biggleswade Chronicle – 1942 – 1943, 1947, 1949, 1952

Bradford Observer – 1836

Bucks Herald – 1901

Catholic Telegraph – 1856 – 1857, 1860, 1862

Clonmel Herald – 1828 – 1831, 1833 – 1836, 1840

County Chronicle, Surrey Herald and Weekly Advertiser for Kent – 1837

Coventry Standard – 1914 – 1918

Dorset County Chronicle – 1824, 1828 – 1829

Downshire Protestant – 1855 – 1856, 1862

Drogheda Conservative Journal – 1837 – 1848

Dublin Evening Mail – 1838

Dublin Evening Packet and Correspondent – 1841 – 1843, 1846 – 1850

Dublin Medical Press – 1846, 1848, 1850 – 1859, 1865

Dublin Monitor – 1840

Dublin Weekly Register – 1839 – 1840, 1842 – 1846

Dundee, Perth, Forfar, and Fife’s People’s Journal – 1914 – 1917

East London Observer – 1863 – 1868

Enniskillen Chronicle and Erne Packet – 1813, 1824 – 1826, 1828 – 1838, 1840 – 1841, 1844

Falkirk Herald – 1875, 1885

Farmer’s Gazette and Journal of Practical Horticulture – 1845 – 1846, 1856 – 1860, 1866, 1868 – 1870

Galway Vindicator, and Connaught Advertiser – 1845, 1856 – 1857, 1869

Gloucester Journal – 1892, 1899

Hamilton Advertiser – 1862 – 1870

Hartlepool Mail – 1927, 1933

Hertford Mercury and Reformer – 1913, 1916 – 1918

Hibernian Journal; or, Chronicle of Liberty – 1784, 1807 – 1808

Ipswich Journal – 1795, 1799

Irish Racing Book and Sheet Calendar – 1860

Kentish Gazette – 1774

Leicester Daily Mercury – 1875 – 1876, 1890

Limerick Evening Post – 1829, 1831, 1833

Limerick Reporter – 1839 – 1840, 1855 – 1858, 1861 – 1870

Lincolnshire Chronicle – 1911

Lincolnshire Echo – 1905, 1909

Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser – 1878

Newry Examiner and Louth Advertiser – 1834 – 1835, 1839, 1846 – 1850, 1854, 1859, 1862, 1864 – 1869

Northampton Mercury – 1942 – 1943, 1947 – 1953

Northern Whig – 1832 – 1851, 1855 – 1856, 1859 – 1861

Perthshire Advertiser – 1918

Portsmouth Evening News – 1908, 1922

Rochdale Observer – 1914 – 1916

Roscommon Messenger – 1848 – 1870

Salisbury and Winchester Journal – 1765 – 1768, 1772 – 1773

Sheffield Independent – 1822, 1827

Sligo Champion – 1867 – 1868

Southern Reporter and Cork Commercial Courier – 1845 – 1846, 1848 – 1850

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette – 1918, 1931

Sussex Agricultural Express – 1926

Tamworth Herald – 1877, 1912

Taunton Courier, and Western Advertiser – 1910, 1930

Tipperary Free Press – 1852 – 1857, 1859, 1865, 1867 – 1868

Tralee Chronicle – 1843 – 1850, 1858 – 1859

Ulster General Advertiser, Herald of Business and General Information – 1858

Waterford Chronicle – 1864 – 1865, 1867

Waterford Mail – 1824, 1832 – 1841, 1843, 1858, 1860 – 1870

Western Daily Press – 1908 – 1909, 1911

Wexford Independent – 1843 – 1856

Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer – 1874, 1889

 
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BBC History Magazine: a special offer for you

Posted on December 14th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

The lovely people at BBC History Magazine have sent us this special offer to share with you:
 
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Save 27% on a BBC History subscription and get a free book

 
BBC History MagazineBBC History is the UK’s bestselling history magazine, exploring a wide range of topics every month including ancient civilisations and the two World Wars. It’s published 13 times a year, so is a great Christmas gift idea for history enthusiasts.

Buy a subscription to BBC History Magazine before 31 December 2014 and not only will you save 27% on the shop price, you can also choose a free book worth up to £25.00.

You can choose between the following publications:

  • Bernard Cornwell, Waterloo: The History of Four Days, Three Armies and Three Battles
  • Richard Overy, A History of War in 100 Battles
  • Dan Jones, The Hollow Crown: The Wars of the Roses and the Rise of the Tudors
  • Tracy Borman, Thomas Cromwell: The untold story of Henry VIII’s most faithful servant

 

Subscribe to BBC History Magazine

 
 

1914’s must-have Christmas gift: the ‘British-made’ toy soldier

Posted on December 12th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Today’s most-popular Christmas toys include Frozen dolls and tech gadgets, but it was a very different story 100 years ago. Newspapers from the time reveal there was a clear trend for ‘British-made’ military toys in the year that Britain joined World War One.
 
An advert for 1914's Great Miniature Battle in the Daily Mirror

Daily Mirror – Friday 04 December 1914
Image © Trinity Mirror. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

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The ‘Great Miniature Battle’ of 1914, with trenches and barbed wire

An advert for Gamage’s department store appeared in the Daily Mirror on 4 December 1914, describing ‘the most realistic thing in Toy Warfare the world has ever seen’. A large battle reconstruction had been set up in the store’s toy hall, featuring ‘Field Guns and Howitzers fired by real gunpowder, trenches and barbed wire’.

We’re able to learn more about the miniature battle thanks to the following article, published in the Dundee Courier on 12 December 1914. It revealed that the Battle of Yser, which occurred in October 1914 and resulted in an Allied victory, was acted out four times every day. The spectators would then ‘rush to buy soldiers – from 5½d to 90s per box’.
 
A description of Gamage's WW1 toy soldier battle reconstruction was printed in the Dundee Courier in 1914

Dundee Courier – Saturday 12 December 1914
Image © D.C.Thomson & Co. Ltd. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page

During WW1 there was ‘never such a demand for toy soldiers’

The Dundee Courier also included an interview with one of the Directors of the department store. It revealed that, despite working around the clock to produce British and German toy soldiers in 1914, Gamage’s was overwhelmed by demand.

Children’s toys had often been imported from Germany, but in 1914 with the two nations at war, ‘British-made’ toys received a surge of popularity. There are currently 4,329 matches for the search term “British made” in newspapers from 1914 at The British Newspaper Archive, compared to 1,602 matches in 1913. This is a 35% increase in the popularity of the term, taking the number of pages currently available online for both years into consideration.
 
British-made toy soldiers were very popular in 1914

Dundee Courier – Saturday 12 December 1914
Image © D.C.Thomson & Co. Ltd. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page

 

Search newspapers from 1914

 

Over 40 Irish titles are now available online

Posted on December 9th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

You can now explore more than 40 newspaper titles from Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland at The British Newspaper Archive after another 17 Irish titles were added in November. The collection is growing all the time and currently spans 1748-1900.

17 extra Irish titles join The British Newspaper Archive

90,000 additional newspaper pages from titles including the Waterford Mail, Enniskillen Chronicle and Roscommon Messenger are now available online. A full list of new additions is provided below:

 

Search the Waterford Mail newspaper archives

 

Advocate: or, Irish Industrial Journal – 1856 – 1860

Athlone Sentinel – 1834

Catholic Telegraph – 1856 – 1857, 1860, 1862

Clonmel Herald – 1828 – 1831, 1833 – 1836, 1840

Drogheda Conservative Journal – 1837 – 1848

Dublin Evening Packet and Correspondent – 1841 – 1843, 1846 – 1850

Dublin Medical Press – 1846, 1848, 1850 – 1859, 1865

Dublin Weekly Register – 1839 – 1840, 1842 – 1846

Enniskillen Chronicle and Erne Packet – 1813, 1824 – 1826, 1828 – 1838, 1840 – 1841, 1844

Farmer’s Gazette and Journal of Practical Horticulture – 1845 – 1846, 1856 – 1860, 1866, 1868 – 1870

Roscommon Messenger – 1848 – 1870

Southern Reporter and Cork Commercial Courier – 1845 – 1846, 1848 – 1850

Tipperary Free Press – 1852 – 1857, 1859, 1865, 1867 – 1868

Tralee Chronicle – 1843 – 1850, 1858 – 1859

Ulster General Advertiser, Herald of Business and General Information – 1858

Waterford Mail – 1824, 1832 – 1841, 1843, 1858, 1860 – 1870

Wexford Independent – 1843 – 1856

 

Search newspapers from the Republic of Ireland

 

Search newspapers from Northern Ireland

 

The British Newspaper Archive is 3 years old

Posted on November 28th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

It’s hard to believe, but The British Newspaper Archive has now reached the grand old age of three. We launched on 29 November 2011 with 4 million fully searchable historic newspaper pages and have come a long way since then.

 

The British Newspaper Archive launched on 29 November 2011 and now has 9 million historical newspaper pages online

Please click the image to enlarge it

 

A treasure trove of information

You can now search more than 9 million pages, from over 300 British and Irish newspaper titles, spanning 1710-1954. Reading all of those pages would be no mean feat – we’ve estimated that it would take you 237 years (with no tea breaks)!

One of the things we’re most proud of is that in our recent survey, 95% of you said you’d found something interesting at The British Newspaper Archive. We’re glad the newspapers are proving so useful and hope you continue to enjoy using them.

You can see some of the fascinating articles that have been uncovered on our blog, including the revelation that Facebook existed in the Edwardian era and that the first top hat caused a commotion in 1797.

 

The British Newspaper Archive has been online for three years, making fascinating historical newspapers available.

Please click the image to enlarge it

 

Revealed: the 5 most popular searches

To celebrate The British Newspaper Archive’s birthday, we used website analytics to work out our five most popular newspaper titles and search terms.

Our most popular titles, based on search volume were:

 

We enjoyed seeing some of the more unusual things you’ve been looking for (such as ‘winning cocktail recipes’ and ‘eyes with red hot needles’!), but these were the five most common search terms:

 

What have you been searching for? We’d love to learn about what you’re researching and how you first heard about The British Newspaper Archive. Help celebrate our birthday by telling us about your experience in the comments section below.

 

 

Thrilling elopement story found in 19th-century newspapers

Posted on November 21st, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Sue Wilkes 
While researching A Visitor’s Guide to Jane Austen’s England, author Sue Wilkes discovered an amazing romance which could have appeared in an Austen novel.

We love hearing about what you’re finding in the newspapers. Tell us about your own discoveries in the comments section below.

 
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Heiress Augusta Nicholson, a most intrepid young lady, showed great ingenuity when she fell in love with handsome John Giles, a penniless comedian.

Miss Nicholson was a ward of chancery and would inherit £14,000 when she came of age. Augusta’s mother was dead, and her father Col. Nicholson had remarried. She seemingly did not get on well with her stepmother Mrs Nicholson.
 
An elopement story found at The British Newspaper Archive

The Hampshire Chronicle revealed how the lovers met

In the autumn of 1809, while her father was away, Augusta and her stepmother visited fashionable Tunbridge Wells. A report in the Hampshire Chronicle reveals that Giles gallantly carried Augusta’s library books home one day and a whirlwind romance began.

The very next evening Augusta and her stepmother went to the theatre to watch Giles perform. They sat in a box near the stage and unseen by her unsuspecting stepmother, Augusta dropped a letter to Giles in which she ‘said that she would marry him’.
 
The Hampshire Chronicle reported a fascinating case of elopement in 1809.

Hampshire Chronicle – Monday 13 November 1809
Image © THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

View the whole newspaper page
 

When Mrs Nicholson discovered their courtship she banned her stepdaughter from going out. Undaunted, Giles smuggled letters to Augusta through the front door key-hole, and every morning for five weeks, Augusta got up before 5am and chatted to him from her bedroom window.

Augusta Nicholson and John Giles eloped to London in 1809

The lovers were desperate to elope, but according to the Hampshire Chronicle, Giles ‘was destitute of the most needful article, money, for carrying on such an exploit’.

After borrowing £30 from a fellow thespian, Giles hired a chaise-and-four and ‘went for his darling’. Like Lydia Bennet and George Wickham in Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, they fled to London, where they could hide easily.
 
Augusta Nicholson and John Giles eloped to London in 1809

Hampshire Chronicle – Monday 13 November 1809
Image © THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

View the whole newspaper page
 

A wedding ring was purchased, and the banns for their marriage read twice at Marylebone Church. At the runaways’ lodgings in Westmorland Place, Augusta made Giles repeatedly swear on the Bible that he would never marry anyone else.

A ‘frantic scene’ and a tragic end

The article from the Hampshire Chronicle went on to reveal that the Nicholson family solicitor tracked Augusta and Giles down. It reported that ‘a frantic tragic scene took place…both lovers rushed into each other’s arms, and swore attachment, beating their heads, and running about the room distracted’.

The game was up. Giles was in real trouble because Augusta was a ward of court, and he was briefly committed to the Fleet prison. The following spring, Augusta finally married John and they had a little boy. This marriage announcement appeared in the Kentish Gazette:
 
A marriage announcement from the Kentish Gazette

Kentish Gazette – Friday 06 April 1810
Image © THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

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The story had a tragic finale. I found a later report in the Hampshire Chronicle, which revealed that Augusta died shortly before she came of age. The estate went to her brother Captain Nicholson, but he died before he could enjoy it, so Augusta and Giles’ child became heir to her fortune.
 
An inheritance announcement in the Hampshire Chronicle

Hampshire Chronicle – Monday 18 November 1811
Image © THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

View the whole newspaper page
 

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Visit Sue’s blog to read more about her research and order a copy of A Visitor’s Guide to Jane Austen’s England.

 
 
 

9 million newspaper pages are now online

Posted on November 18th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Over 400,000 pages were added to The British Newspaper Archive in October, bringing the current total up to more than 9 million pages.

 

Search the newspapers

 

83 newspaper titles were added or updated, including Aris’s Birmingham Gazette, the Manchester Mercury and the Drogheda Journal, or Meath & Louth Advertiser. A full list is provided below.

The additions included 12 brand new Irish titles, from both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Read this blog post about our Irish newspapers to learn more about the titles we’ve added in the last few months.

 

The Drogheda Journal's newspaper archives are now online

 

Aberdeen People’s Journal – 1878, 1880, 1885, 1898 – 1899, 1901 – 1906, 1908

Arbroath Herald and Advertiser for the Montrose Burghs – 1922 – 1940

Aris’s Birmingham Gazette – 1741, 1746, 1761, 1772, 1791, 1798, 1800 – 1801, 1803 – 1804, 1808 – 1809, 1813 – 1814, 1817, 1824 – 1862, 1864 – 1867

Bedfordshire Times and Independent – 1893, 1899 – 1901, 1903 – 1904, 1908 – 1909, 1912 – 1913, 1917 – 1919, 1923 – 1924, 1930 – 1931, 1934, 1936 – 1940, 1944

Belfast Mercantile Register and Weekly Advertiser – 1842, 1844, 1847

Belfast Mercury – 1851 – 1861

Biggleswade Chronicle – 1898 – 1899, 1901, 1910 – 1911, 1913 – 1918, 1920

Bradford Daily Telegraph – 1869

Bradford Observer – 1835

Bucks Herald – 1922 – 1924, 1934, 1939 – 1946

Bury and Norwich Post – 1845 – 1846, 1848

Cheltenham Chronicle – 1827 – 1831, 1833 – 1835, 1837 – 1840, 1842 – 1849, 1863

Cheltenham Looker-On – 1858, 1878, 1880

Chester Chronicle – 1916

Cobbett’s Weekly Political Register – 1808

Coventry Herald – 1878, 1909

Downshire Protestant – 1858 – 1861

Drogheda Journal, or Meath & Louth Advertiser – 1829 – 1830, 1834 – 1835, 1839 – 1840

Drogheda News Letter – 1813

Dublin Builder, The – 1859 – 1866

Dublin Evening Mail – 1845 – 1848, 1859 – 1860

Dublin Mercantile Advertiser, and Weekly Price Current – 1850

Dublin Monitor – 1838, 1841 – 1844

Dumfries and Galloway Standard – 1865

Dundee Advertiser – 1886, 1893 – 1894, 1896

Dundee Evening Telegraph – 1877 – 1950

Dundee, Perth, Forfar, and Fife’s People’s Journal – 1887 – 1888, 1890, 1918

Durham County Advertiser – 1833, 1838 – 1839

Edinburgh Evening News – 1924

Exeter and Plymouth Gazette – 1900

Falkirk Herald – 1862, 1864, 1880, 1882, 1884, 1890, 1892, 1914 – 1918

Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate & Cheriton Herald – 1909, 1916, 1922, 1926

Galway Vindicator, and Connaught Advertiser – 1841 – 1844, 1846 – 1855, 1864 – 1868, 1870

Gloucester Journal – 1861, 1881, 1887, 1932 – 1933

Gloucestershire Chronicle – 1852 – 1854, 1865, 1877, 1879 – 1880, 1893, 1896, 1911

Gloucestershire Echo – 1888 – 1889, 1893, 1899

Hampshire Chronicle – 1783, 1785, 1795

Hartlepool Mail – 1885, 1925 – 1926, 1930, 1934 – 1935, 1937 – 1939, 1943 – 1954

Hertford Mercury and Reformer – 1871 – 1888

Herts Guardian, Agricultural Journal, and General Advertiser – 1861

Illustrated Times – 1858 – 1859, 1865

Ipswich Journal, The – 1779 – 1780, 1782, 1791, 1793

Irish Racing Book and Sheet Calendar, The – 1849 – 1859, 1861 – 1864, 1866

Kent & Sussex Courier – 1880 – 1882, 1884, 1886 – 1887, 1892, 1894

Lancashire Evening Post – 1894, 1903, 1934

Leamington Spa Courier – 1925, 1929 – 1930, 1934, 1937, 1939, 1949, 1951 – 1954

Leicester Chronicle – 1817, 1821 – 1826, 1848, 1850, 1903

Leicester Daily Mercury – 1879, 1889, 1898

Limerick Evening Post – 1828, 1830, 1832

Limerick Reporter – 1850 – 1852, 1854, 1859 – 1860

Lincolnshire Echo – 1907, 1948, 1950

Liverpool Courier and Commercial Advertiser – 1870

Liverpool Evening Express – 1914

Luton News and Bedfordshire Chronicle – 1897

Manchester Mercury – 1752 – 1753, 1755, 1760, 1762 – 1764, 1769, 1771 – 1772, 1774 – 1780, 1784 – 1788, 1790 – 1794, 1797 – 1798, 1802 – 1803, 1806, 1809, 1815 – 1816, 1819 – 1821, 1823 – 1825, 1827, 1830

Motherwell Times – 1920, 1929, 1934, 1937

Newry Examiner and Louth Advertiser – 1851 – 1853, 1855, 1857 – 1858, 1860, 1863, 1870

Northampton Mercury – 1908 – 1909, 1913, 1915 – 1916, 1918 – 1920, 1924 – 1941, 1944 – 1946, 1954

Northern Whig – 1852 – 1854, 1858, 1863 – 1867

Perthshire Advertiser – 1840 – 1842, 1847, 1856, 1859, 1862, 1865 – 1869

Portsmouth Evening News – 1905 – 1907, 1909, 1912 – 1915, 1921, 1923 – 1925, 1927, 1943

Pue’s Occurrences – 1748, 1756

Reading Mercury – 1786, 1788, 1914

Sheffield Evening Telegraph – 1920

Sherborne Mercury – 1770 – 1771

Shields Daily Gazette – 1911

Sligo Champion – 1869 – 1870

South Bucks Free Press, Wycombe and Maidenhead Journal – 1859, 1865

Southern Reporter – 1945

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette – 1916, 1938

Surrey Advertiser – 1869 – 1870

Sussex Advertiser – 1849, 1852

Sussex Agricultural Express – 1897

Swindon Advertiser and North Wilts Chronicle – 1861

Taunton Courier, and Western Advertiser – 1837, 1906 – 1907, 1909, 1921 – 1922, 1926, 1928

Ulsterman, The – 1856 – 1859

Waterford Chronicle – 1836, 1839

Watford Observer – 1868

Wells Journal – 1884

West Briton and Cornwall Advertiser – 1889

Western Daily Press – 1863

Western Mail – 1914

Worcester Journal – 1808 – 1809, 1811 – 1816, 1818 – 1821, 1829 – 1830, 1850 – 1851, 1864

 

17 Irish newspaper titles added to The British Newspaper Archive

Posted on November 12th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Those of you who keep an eye on our Latest Additions page will have noticed that we’ve recently been adding a lot of new titles from Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.

In total, 17 Irish newspaper titles have joined The British Newspaper Archive in the last few months. There’s more to come, but take a look at what’s already available online.

Newspaper titles from Northern Ireland

1) Belfast Mercantile Register and Weekly Advertiser

The Belfast Mercantile Register's archives are online at The British Newspaper Archive
 
Current coverage: 1,200 newspaper pages from 1842, 1844-1845 and 1847-1849.
 
Search the Belfast Mercantile Register
 
 

2) Belfast Mercury

Belfast Mercury archives are available online at The British Newspaper Archive
 
Current coverage: 2,800 newspaper pages from 1851-1861.
 
Search the Belfast Mercury
 
 

3) Downshire Protestant

The Downshire Protestant's newspaper archives are now online
 
Current coverage: 1,000 newspaper pages from 1856 and 1858-1861.
 
Search the Downshire Protestant
 
 

4) Newry Examiner and Louth Advertiser

The Newry Examiner newspaper archives are now online
 
Current coverage: 4,500 newspaper pages from 1851-1855, 1857-1858, 1860, 1863 and 1869-1870.
 
Search the Newry Examiner
 
 

5) Northern Whig

The Northern Whig's newspaper archives are being added to The British Newspaper Archive
 
Current coverage: 15,000 newspaper pages from 1839-1840, 1846-1847, 1852-1854, 1858 and 1863-1870.
 
Search the Northern Whig
 
 

6) Ulsterman

The Ulsterman's newspaper archives are now online
 
Current coverage: 1,800 newspaper pages from 1856-1859.
 
Search the Ulsterman
 
 

Newspaper titles from the Republic of Ireland

1) Drogheda Journal, or Meath & Louth Advertiser

The Drogheda Journal's newspaper archives are now online
 
Current coverage: 4,400 newspaper pages from 1828-1836 and 1838-1840.
 
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2) Dublin Builder

The Dublin Builder's newspaper archives are now online
 
Current coverage: 3,400 newspaper pages from 1859-1866.
 
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3) Dublin Mercantile Advertiser, and Weekly Price Current

The Dublin Mercantile Register's newspaper archives are now online
 
Current coverage: 200 newspaper pages from 1850.
 
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4) Dublin Monitor

The Dublin Monitor's newspaper archives are now online
 
Current coverage: 3,000 newspaper pages from 1838-1839 and 1841-1844.
 
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5) Galway Vindicator, and Connaught Advertiser

The Galway Vindicator has been added to The British Newspaper Archive
 
Current coverage: 9,600 newspaper pages from 1841-1844, 1846-1855, 1858-1859, 1861 and 1864-1870.
 
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6) Hibernian Journal; or, Chronicle of Liberty

The Hibernian Journal's newspaper archives are now online
 
Current coverage: 6,300 newspaper pages from 1773-1776, 1778, 1780-1783 and 1805-1806.
 
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7) Irish Racing Book and Sheet Calendar

Search the archives of the Irish Racing Calendar
 
Current coverage: 400 newspaper pages from 1849-1859, 1861-1864 and 1866.
 
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8) Limerick Evening Post

Seach the online archives of the Limerick Evening Post
 
Current coverage: 1,900 newspaper pages from 1828-1832.
 
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9) Limerick Reporter

The Limerick Reporter's newspaper archives are now online
 
Current coverage: 3,200 newspaper pages from 1850-1852, 1854-1855, 1859-1860 and 1864.
 
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10) Pue’s Occurences

Search historical copies of the newspaper, Pue's Occurences
 
Current coverage: 1,100 newspaper pages from 1748 and 1756-1758.
 
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11) Waterford Chronicle

The Waterford Chronicle's newspaper archives are online at The British Newspaper Archive
 
Current coverage: 800 newspaper pages from 1836 and 1839.
 
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