Archive for the “News from the past” Category

Examples of Winston Churchill’s work as a war correspondent

Posted on October 13th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Simon Read is currently using The British Newspaper Archive to research Winston Churchill’s adventures as a war correspondent. He got in touch to show us some examples of Churchill’s journalism.   **************   Hear the name Winston Churchill, and what comes to mind? Most likely, it’s Churchill the war leader with his ever-present cigar, bulldog […]

‘Dear Boss’ letter: how Jack the Ripper got his name

Posted on September 18th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

On 27 September 1888, in the midst of a series of horrific murders in Whitechapel, the Central News Office in London received a letter, signed by ‘Jack the Ripper’. Known as the ‘Dear Boss’ letter because of the way it was addressed, the letter changed the way British newspapers reported the Ripper murders.   Read […]

London cabbie George Smith arrested for drunk driving in 1897

Posted on September 9th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

The first person to be arrested and charged for driving under the influence of alcohol was George Smith, a London cabdriver. Charged with drunk driving on 10 September 1897 This article from the Morning Post reported that at about 00:45 on Friday 10 September 1897, Smith’s vehicle ‘swerved from one side of the road to […]

Historic headlines: Great Britain joins World War Two on 3 September 1939

Posted on September 2nd, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Not only does 2014 mark the 100th anniversary of World War One, it is also the 75th anniversary of the start of World War Two.   Newspaper headlines from the beginning of WW2 Britain declared war on Germany on 3 September 1939, following Nazi Germany’s invasion of Poland on 1 September.   Search newspapers from […]

The Manchester Courier takes a different view of World War One

Posted on August 4th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

The Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser, like other British newspapers, reported that Britain joined the First World War on 4 August 1914. The Courier makes for especially fascinating reading because it reported the news in a very different way.   Manchester Courier: ‘Keep your country out of a wicked and stupid war’ Many newspapers […]

Is this the Illustrated Police News’ best illustration?

Posted on August 1st, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

If you’ve ever explored the Illustrated Police News at The British Newspaper Archive, you’ll know it’s full of fantastically melodramatic images and stories. We think we may have come across our favourite illustration so far. Victorian ladies attacked by an octopus This image graced the front page of the Illustrated Police News on Saturday 17 […]

Historic headlines: Great Britain joins World War One on 4 August 1914

Posted on July 30th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Following an ultimatum to withdraw German troops from Belgium, Britain declared war on Germany on 4 August 1914. Monday 4 August 2014 will mark the 100th anniversary of the start of Britain’s involvement in World War One. Front pages from the start of World War One The news that Britain had joined World War One […]

The start of WW1: Austria-Hungary declares war

Posted on July 28th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

World War One officially started on 28 July 1914 when Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia. There are currently 25 newspapers from 28 July 1914 available to view online at The British Newspaper Archive. You’ll find clippings from some of these newspapers below, showing how the start of the war was reported.   Explore newspapers from […]

Mrs Caudle: a 19th-century woman not to be crossed

Posted on July 7th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Mrs Caudle first appeared as a character in Punch magazine in 1845. She was portrayed as the archetypal nagging wife, always telling her husband off for something.     The West Kent Guardian reveals the real Mrs Caudle This article from the West Kent Guardian reveals that the real-life Mrs Caudle was also a woman […]

‘Cut your hair’: a court report in the Morning Post

Posted on July 2nd, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Historical newspapers are full of reports about local criminal trials. These are a great resource for both historical research and genealogy. Not only can you track the sorts of crimes that were being committed and how people were punished, you might also find your ancestors’ names mentioned.   Search local court reports   The Morning […]