Archive for the “Your newspaper discoveries” Category

Using newspapers to research the Luton Hoo estate

Posted on July 23rd, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Tom Mason-Mckean works as a volunteer with the Luton Hoo Walled Garden project, looking into all aspects of the estate’s history. It was great to hear how he’s been using The British Newspaper Archive in his research.   **************   When I retired and started looking around for something to keep me occupied, I noticed […]

Working with Wikipedia to bring history facts to light

Posted on July 18th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

We’ve recently donated 100 subscriptions to the Wikipedia community through the Wikipedia Library, a grant-funded programme which makes it easier for experienced volunteer editors to access research materials. It’s very exciting to be involved in this new partnership. It allows us to contribute to Wikipedia, one of the most frequently used reference tools in the world, […]

National newspapers, local newspapers and cases of breach of promise

Posted on June 17th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Denise Bates, historian and author of Breach of Promise to Marry: A History of How Jilted Brides Settled Scores, explains why local newspapers are often more useful for historical research than national newspapers.   **************   Breach of promise was a legal claim. It allowed a man or woman to demand financial compensation from their […]

Family tree research: How newspapers can help

Posted on June 16th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Newspapers are a fantastic resource for family history research. They can reveal incredible details about your ancestors.   View 3 newspaper articles for free   You’ll find millions of pages from local British and Irish newspapers at The British Newspaper Archive. They date from the 1700s to the 1950s. Register a free account and the […]

The ‘Ocean Child’ and the sinking of the RMS Tayleur

Posted on June 5th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Gill Hoffs, author of The Sinking of RMS Tayleur: The Lost Story of the ‘Victorian Titanic’ used The British Newspaper Archive extensively for her research. She got in touch to tell us the touching story of the ‘Ocean Child’. We’d love to hear about what you’ve discovered too – email press@britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk   **************   Put […]

Oscar Wilde’s lecture tours

Posted on April 30th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Geoff Dibb, author of Oscar Wilde – A Vagabond with a Mission, got in touch to tell us about his research and how The British Newspaper Archive has helped. We’d love to hear about your own research experiences – email press@britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk to tell us your story. ************** Researching Oscar Wilde in libraries I began researching […]

Researching animals with historical newspapers

Posted on April 24th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Hannah Velten recently got in touch to tell us how she uses The British Newspaper Archive to research a rather niche subject – the history of animals within society. Show us what you’re researching at the moment by emailing press@britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk   **************   One day it could be a toad emerging from a rock or […]

Your newspaper discoveries: Court cases, suicide and an obituary

Posted on March 20th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Alex Daley got in touch this month to tell us about the fascinating information he’s uncovered in the Hastings and St Leonards Observer. What have you found in the newspapers? Email press@britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk to let us know! ************** As a self-confessed social and family history buff I was delighted to be asked to undertake a research […]

Death of the real Sherlock Holmes

Posted on March 10th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

A 19th-century police officer named Jerome Caminada died 100 years ago today. Angela Buckley, author of The Real Sherlock Holmes: The Hidden Story of Jerome Caminada, explains what newspapers can tell us about the detective’s incredible life. ************** On 10 March 1914, just five days before his 70th birthday, Detective Jerome Caminada died at home. […]

Your newspaper discoveries: The case of the poisonous Bath buns

Posted on February 18th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Michelle Higgs, author of A Visitor’s Guide to Victorian England, got in touch to share this shocking story she found in The British Newspaper Archive. What have you found in the newspapers? Let us know by emailing press@britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk ************** Victorian Britain was a hazardous place to live, and not just because there was a potential […]