300,000 newspaper pages added, including the Daily Mirror

Posted on May 9th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

The British Newspaper Archive added 300,000 new pages to the website last month, including six brand new titles.
 
Search the newspapers
 

You can now search editions of the Daily Mirror (the national newspaper), Hamilton Advertiser, The Lancashire Evening Post, The Oxford Times, Perthshire Advertiser and The Shetland Times. A full list of recent additions is provided below.

There’s never been a better time to subscribe to The British Newspaper Archive, especially as you can now access all of these newspapers with our new 1 month subscription for just £9.95.

 

Daily Mirror

 

Aberdeen Evening Express – 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954

Aberdeen Journal – 1844, 1845, 1847, 1848, 1851, 1858, 1859, 1860, 1861, 1862, 1863, 1865, 1866, 1867, 1868, 1870, 1871, 1872, 1873, 1874, 1876, 1886, 1888, 1893, 1894, 1895, 1898, 1903

Arbroath Herald and Advertiser for the Montrose Burghs – 1889

Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette – 1800, 1803, 1807, 1808, 1811, 1813, 1863

Birmingham Daily Mail, The – 1914, 1916, 1917

Birmingham Daily Post – 1914, 1915, 1916, 1917, 1918

Birmingham Gazette – 1918

Birmingham Journal – 1832, 1833, 1834, 1835, 1836, 1838

Bradford Observer – 1866, 1867

Burnley Express – 1905, 1906

Burnley Gazette – 1902

Cambridge Independent Press – 1871, 1873, 1875, 1876, 1877, 1878, 1879, 1880, 1881, 1882, 1883, 1884, 1885, 1886, 1887, 1888, 1889, 1890, 1891, 1892, 1894, 1895, 1898, 1900, 1901, 1902, 1903, 1904, 1905, 1906, 1907, 1908, 1909, 1910, 1914, 1915, 1916, 1917, 1918, 1919, 1920

Cheltenham Chronicle – 1887, 1930

Chester Chronicle – 1775, 1811

Chester Courant – 1825, 1826, 1827, 1828, 1829

Coventry Herald – 1890, 1891, 1893, 1894, 1895, 1896, 1899, 1900, 1901, 1902, 1903, 1904, 1905, 1907

Daily Gazette for Middlesbrough – 1914, 1915, 1916, 1918

Daily Mirror – 1915

Derby Mercury – 1848

Derbyshire Times and Chesterfield Herald – 1862

Dover Express – 1898, 1950

Dublin Evening Mail – 1831, 1833, 1840, 1842

Dundee Advertiser – 1863

Durham County Advertiser, The – 1844

Edinburgh Evening News – 1894

Evening Despatch – 1914, 1916

Evening Telegraph – 1881

Falkirk Herald – 1866

Gloucester Citizen – 1911, 1922

Gloucester Journal – 1793, 1795, 1796

Grantham Journal – 1928

Hamilton Advertiser – 1917, 1918

Hartlepool Mail – 1881

Hastings and St Leonards Observer – 1942, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1951, 1952

Lancashire Evening Post, The – 1887, 1888, 1891, 1892, 1893, 1895, 1896, 1897, 1899, 1900, 1902, 1904, 1905, 1908, 1918, 1919, 1920, 1933, 1935, 1937, 1940, 1944, 1946

Leamington Spa Courier – 1839

Liverpool Daily Post – 1915, 1916, 1917, 1918

Manchester Courier, and Lancashire General Advertiser – 1898

Morpeth Herald – 1914, 1917, 1918

Newcastle Daily Journal and Courant – 1917

Oxford Times, The – 1863, 1864, 1865, 1866, 1867, 1868, 1869, 1870

Perthshire Advertiser – 1914, 1915, 1916, 1917

Portsmouth Evening News – 1938

Sheffield Daily Telegraph – 1865, 1891, 1892

Sheffield Evening Telegraph – 1906, 1908, 1910, 1913, 1915, 1916, 1918

Shetland Times, The – 1872, 1885

Shields Daily Gazette – 1871, 1874

Southern Reporter – 1858, 1928, 1929

Stamford Mercury – 1746, 1829

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette – 1911, 1935, 1936, 1937

Sussex Agricultural Express, The – 1892, 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1924, 1925, 1931, 1932, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1951, 1953

Western Gazette – 1876, 1877

Wiltshire Independent – 1836, 1845

Yorkshire Evening Post – 1913, 1942, 1944, 1952

Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer, The – 1867, 1893, 1909, 1923, 1925

Roger Bannister and the four-minute mile

Posted on May 6th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Roger Bannister became the first man to run a mile in under four minutes on 6 May 1954.

You can search British newspapers from 1954 online at The British Newspaper Archive, so we took a look to see how the incredible feat was reported.

 

‘Something typically British about this new world record’

The Aberdeen Evening Express published an article about Roger Bannister the following day, proudly stating that ‘Britain’s great mile-runner has achieved the ambition of all athletes; he has broken the four-minute mile barrier’.

 

Roger Bannister's four-minute mile

Aberdeen Evening Express – Friday 07 May 1954
Image © D.C.Thomson & Co. Ltd. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page

 

The newspaper went on to describe how the 25-year-old returned to his university, the University of Oxford, to create the new world record. He was watched by ‘an excited but not demonstrative small crowd of about 1000… There were no bands, no cheer-leaders; there was no super-stadium packed with thousands of roaring supporters’.

 

Read more newspaper reports about Roger Bannister

We make every single word searchable when we put historical newspapers online at The British Newspaper Archive, so you can search for absolutely anything.

 

Search the newspapers for Roger Bannister

 

 

Oscar Wilde’s lecture tours

Posted on April 30th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Geoff Dibb, author of Oscar Wilde – A Vagabond with a Mission, got in touch to tell us about his research and how The British Newspaper Archive has helped.

We’d love to hear about your own research experiences – email press@britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk to tell us your story.

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Researching Oscar Wilde in libraries

I began researching Oscar Wilde’s lecture tours of Britain and Ireland after reading a letter from Wilde, written while lecturing in Leeds. I live about 10 miles south and was amazed that this man had visited somewhere so close by.

Oscar WildeI visited the Leeds Local History Library in an effort to find out more. At this time (the late 1980s), you needed to search through enormous bound volumes of Victorian broadsheet newspapers. Often the newspapers were brittle with age and had turned a deep orange colour, their edges flaking and the pages very easily torn.

I knew the lecture date and soon found adverts and reviews of Wilde’s two lectures on that day. I began to visit libraries all over Yorkshire, finding that Wilde had visited most of our major towns and cities. Gradually I spread my net and visited libraries all over Britain.

Early finds in newspapers

Collecting information was incredibly time consuming to begin with. In the first place, I had to make the journey to the library. Sometimes I didn’t have a lecture date, so started looking in newspapers from June 1883 onwards, page after page. Poring over enormous pages of dense Victorian newsprint, looking for the words ‘Oscar’ and ‘Wilde’ becomes rather monotonous!

However, I turned up much new information and began to write articles in 1994 for the Oscar Wilde Society Journal, The Wildean.

The British Newspaper Archive as a major research resource

Help was to arrive via the internet and The British Newspaper Archive. The website has been an enormous help to me in collecting more information about the lectures I was already aware of but, importantly, also enabling me to find those so-elusive new ones.

Very soon I was downloading advertisements and reviews galore, without having to travel and by letting the search engine do all of that tedious page by page scrutiny, happier that ‘it’ was less likely to miss an entry than I was whilst squinting at dark orange newspaper pages.

Eventually, I had amassed information about more than 250 lectures Wilde gave from 1883 to 1888. I not only knew where he had been but what he had said and whom he had met. The Oscar Wilde Society has now published my book about these lectures: Oscar Wilde – A Vagabond with a Mission.

A few of the articles I have uncovered

Here are a few examples of what I have found. First, quite a detailed advertisement for a lecture in Bath:

Oscar Wilde at Bath

Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette – Thursday 02 October 1884
Image © THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

View the whole newspaper page

 

Now and again, the advertisers went over the top to attract the public’s attention:

Oscar Wilde at Liverpool

Liverpool Mercury – Saturday 06 October 1883
Image © THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

View the whole newspaper page

 

Some of Wilde’s best-supported lectures, with audiences of up to 5,000 people, were to do with the ‘Sunday Society’. The society wanted museums and galleries to be open on a Sunday. Here we see that Wilde supported this idea:

Oscar Wilde at York

York Herald – Saturday 11 June 1887
Image © THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

View the whole newspaper page

 

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Visit the Oscar Wilde Society’s website to find out more and order a copy of Geoff’s book.

 

Shakespeare on the Tube Strike

Posted on April 29th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Search The British Newspaper Archive for the words ‘Tube strike’ and you’ll find hundreds of stories about London Underground strikes of the past.

While most newspapers printed serious reports, we’ve found a few that couldn’t resist making a joke or two.

 

Tu-be or not tu-be

The Derby Daily Telegraph imagined how William Shakespeare would have responded to the Tube strike of 1919:

Shakespeare on the Tube Strike

 

Derby Daily Telegraph – Wednesday 05 February 1919
Image © Local World Limited. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page

 

Even the Tube strike has its advertising uses

It seems one enterprising London chemist used the 1918 strike as an opportunity to sell some more ‘tonic elixir’.

Advertising during the Tube strike

 

Hull Daily Mail – Tuesday 27 August 1918
Image © Local World Limited. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page

 

Those you would be glad to get rid of never go on strike

The Burnley Express complained that ‘tax collectors and people of that sort’ never go on strike.

Tax collectors never go on strike

 

Burnley Express – Saturday 14 June 1924
Image © Johnston Press plc. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page

 

Where stands England today?

‘Well, some of it pretty obviously is standing in overcrowded London ‘buses’ quipped one journalist.

Overcrowded buses during the Tube strike

 

Derby Daily Telegraph – Friday 07 February 1919
Image © Local World Limited. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page

Behind the scenes: Who Do You Think You Are? LIVE

Posted on April 26th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

In this month’s ‘behind the scenes’ blog post, Scott and Andrew from The British Newspaper Archive’s scanning team tell us about their trip to London to attend Who Do You Think You Are? LIVE.

 

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Scott and Andrew Welcome to the second update from the newspaper scanning team in Boston Spa, Yorkshire. We are now in full operation and working to the high standards that the original Colindale team set for us.

Who Do You Think You Are? LIVE

In February, we were given the opportunity to attend the annual Who Do You Think You Are? LIVE event held at London Olympia.

Following on from the successful television show, the show is the world’s leading family history event, bringing together family historians, genealogy experts and numerous family history organisations.

The British Newspaper Archive had its own stand and we were honoured to be asked to go and speak about what we do, as well as meet our customers.

 

Using newspapers for family history

We were amazed by the sheer volume of people wanting to know about the website, their obvious passion for the past and dedication to tracing their family tree.

We were able to give advice about using The British Newspaper Archive for family history research and have since helped to write a blog post about our top tips for searching the newspapers

The newspaper searches we helped with revealed some amazing information about our customers’ ancestors. One woman found details about a relative who had died in a mining accident and another found this photograph of her ancestor:

 

Photo in the Aberdeen Evening Express

 

Aberdeen Evening Express – Tuesday 04 June 1918
Image © D.C.Thomson & Co. Ltd. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page

 

Scanning historical newspapers

Our experience at Who Do You Think You Are? LIVE was an eye-opening one. Although we knew that the newspapers we scan are full of interesting stories, we didn’t fully understand just how useful they can be for family history research.

It has made us want to do our jobs to the highest possible standard, so we can help the people we met at the event.

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See what you can discover about your family history with local and regional newspapers dating back to the 1700s.
 
Search for an ancestor’s name to get started

 

A WW1 letter from Gallipoli

Posted on April 25th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

The WW1 Gallipoli Campaign began on 25 April 1915, resulting in the loss of approximately 50,000 men from Australia, Britain, France and New Zealand.

A poignant letter from an attending nurse was sent to an Australian woman living in London and printed in the Tamworth Herald.

 

‘It breaks my heart to see them’

The letter describes the nurse’s work at the Dardanelles during World War One and includes this incredibly moving comment:

‘It’s a sad time for us all, but you can be proud of being an Australian. Our men are perfect dears at all times. They bear suffering and trouble without a whimper, and just die smiling. It breaks my heart to see them.’

 

Letter from Gallipoli in 1915

Tamworth Herald – Saturday 07 August 1915
Image © Local World Limited. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page

 

Researching animals with historical newspapers

Posted on April 24th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Hannah Velten recently got in touch to tell us how she uses The British Newspaper Archive to research a rather niche subject – the history of animals within society.

Show us what you’re researching at the moment by emailing press@britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk

 

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One day it could be a toad emerging from a rock or a person kicked by a horse – I never know what I’m going to find when I log into The British Newspaper Archive each day. My goal is simply to unearth a nugget of animal history related to the day’s date.

Kicked by a horseThere’s no academic rigour involved: I type ‘animal’ into the search area, specify the date, with a year chosen at random, and wait to see what comes up. Some days the search only reveals one entry and some days I’m overwhelmed with tens of pages, but I will pick a story from page one.

 

Animal History Daily on Twitter

I should explain this rather odd behaviour… I’m tweeting a story every day during 2014, using the hashtag #AHD, and exploring the details behind the 140-characters in a weekly blog post.

Why? Because I’m rather obsessed with our historical interaction with animals and at the end of 2013, while promoting my book Beastly London: A History of Animals in the City, I felt that after seven years of research and writing it would be fun to find further inspiration by serendipitous means.

 

A Tail without a Pig!

My first story got me hooked. It’s not a pleasant one, but it’s surprising, jovial and beautifully provincial, proving animals were once so much a part of everyday life:

 

Article about a tail without a pig

 

Royal Cornwall Gazette - Saturday 01 January 1820
Image © THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

View the whole newspaper page

 

To give you an idea of the variety of animal stories I find, here are several of my favourites from the ones I’ve covered so far – they give an amazingly quirky insight into social history.

 

Fall of a ‘Baldwin Pony’

This is an example of an extreme circus animal act that sadly went wrong. It led to a RSPCA-backed court case where the charge of cruelty was eventually dropped.

 

Article about the fall of a Baldwin pony

 

Lloyd’s Weekly Newspaper - Sunday 03 March 1889
Image © THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

View the whole newspaper page

 

A Too Clever Dog

Another court case, but this time involving a dog bite and an oddly proud owner.

 

Article about a 'too clever dog'

 

Sheffield Independent - Saturday 19 February 1853
Image © THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

View the whole newspaper page

 

Sheep as Mascot

A buried sheep lives on to become the mascot of the coal tippers at Swansea Docks.

 

Article about a sheep mascot

 

The Daily Herald - Tuesday 19 January 1926
Image © Trinity Mirror. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page

 

Elephants in the River

This article records the rescue of menagerie elephants from a river when their caravan tipped over.

 

Article about an elephant rescue

 

Bury and Norwich Post - Wednesday 16 February 1842
Image © THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

View the whole newspaper page

 

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Visit Hannah’s blog Animal History Daily: Random Titbits from the Archives to see more of her fascinating finds.

 

 

Wartime St George’s Day advert

Posted on April 23rd, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

St George’s Day and the anniversary of Shakespeare’s birth both fall on 23 April.

 

‘There will be justice and victory’

This patriotic advert from Ford was published in The Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer to mark the day during World War Two.

It states that ‘wherever the tongue of Shakespeare is spoken, there will be justice and victory’.

 

St George's Day advert

 

View the whole newspaper page

The Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer – Thursday 22 April 1943
Image © Johnston Press plc. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

 

New 1 month subscription – only £9.95

Posted on April 17th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

 

You can now purchase a 1 month subscription to The British Newspaper Archive for just £9.95.

The new subscription is less than half the price of our old 30 day package and you can view more newspaper pages.

 

Buy a 1 month subscription

 

Unlimited access for under £10

The new 1 month subscription is great value for money, giving you unlimited access* to all of our historic newspapers.

Take a look at how it compares to the old 30 day package:

 

1 month subscription

 

Discover amazing stories from the past

Your subscription will let you to search, view and print fascinating articles published in British and Irish newspapers between 1710 and 1954.

With thousands of newspaper pages added every week, there’s always something new to discover at The British Newspaper Archive.

 

Buy a 1 month subscription

 

*Subject to our standard fair usage policy of 3,000 pages per month. For more information, please read our Terms & Conditions

135,000 newspaper pages added

Posted on April 10th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Thousands of extra newspaper pages were added to The British Newspaper Archive in March, including a brand new title – the Evening Despatch.

 

Search the newspapers

 

24 other titles were updated this month, including the Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette, the Dublin Evening Mail and Nottingham Evening Post. You’ll find a full list of recent additions provided below.

 

The Nottingham Evening Post

 

Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette – 1769, 1801, 1804, 1805, 1806, 1810, 1812, 1814, 1815, 1816, 1817, 1818, 1819
Birmingham Daily Mail, The – 1881, 1882, 1891, 1906, 1915
Birmingham Gazette – 1914, 1915, 1916, 1917
Cambridge Independent Press – 1889
Cheltenham Chronicle – 1886, 1894, 1895, 1899, 1900
Derby Daily Telegraph – 1889
Dover Express – 1895
Dublin Evening Mail – 1827, 1828
Edinburgh Evening News – 1905, 1906
Evening Despatch – 1915, 1917, 1918
Evening Telegraph – 1879, 1880, 1882, 1884, 1886, 1890, 1892
Gloucester Citizen – 1912, 1934, 1941
Kendal Mercury – 1870
Leamington Spa Courier – 1840
Liverpool Daily Post – 1875, 1876, 1906
Newcastle Journal – 1893, 1917
Nottingham Evening Post – 1904, 1906, 1907, 1908, 1909, 1911, 1912, 1915, 1917, 1919, 1920, 1922, 1938, 1939, 1946, 1949
Reading Mercury – 1873
Salisbury and Winchester Journal – 1788, 1789
Sports Argus, The – 1917, 1918
Stamford Mercury – 1827, 1832, 1846
Sussex Agricultural Express, The – 1891, 1893, 1945
Western Gazette – 1865, 1907, 1909, 1929
Yorkshire Evening Post – 1915, 1929, 1930, 1936, 1937, 1939
Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer, The – 1870, 1937