Copies of old newspapers reveal a World Cup myth

Posted on June 11th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

England took part in the World Cup for the first time in 1950. Like this year’s tournament, the football matches were held in Brazil. The English national team met the United States in the group stages and suffered a shocking 1-0 defeat.

The game has gone down in football history and has a rather interesting urban myth attached to it. Many say that English newspapers reported a 10-1 win, assuming that there had been a typing error in the message they received from Brazil.

 

England World Cup team 1950

Nottingham Evening Post – Tuesday 13 June 1950
Image © Local World Limited. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page

 

Copies of old newspapers reveal the truth

There are over 8 million newspaper pages online at The British Newspaper Archive, so we thought we’d take a look to see if the rumours were true.

We searched copies of old newspapers from 1950 for the words ‘England US World Cup’.

The United States were certainly seen to be the underdogs. On the day of the football match, the Derby Daily Telegraph confidently reported that ‘ENGLAND EXPECT A COMFORTABLE WIN’:

 

England faced the US at the 1950 World Cup

Derby Daily Telegraph – Thursday 29 June 1950
Image © Local World Limited. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page

 

World cup shock for England

The Western Morning News was printed early the day after the infamous football match. While it was clearly shocked by the result, the newspaper correctly reported the score as 1-0.

The article stated that England had lost ‘against the 500-1 outsiders’, having played poorly. England’s manager Walter Winterbottom was reported to have sat glumly in the stand.

Winterbottom later said that ‘the team played very badly indeed, especially the forwards, who were far too eager’.

 

Copies of old newspapers show the England vs United States World Cup score in 1950 was not reported as 10-1

Western Morning News – Friday 30 June 1950
Image © Local World Limited. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page

 

There was no fluke about it

Not one of the historical newspapers online at The British Newspaper Archive reported the score to be 10-1. It appears that this World Cup story is a myth.

The Aberdeen Journal stated that ‘it was pathetic to watch English football beaten by a side most amateur elevens would beat at home, and there was no fluke about it’.

 

Historical newspapers reveal the truth behind the World Cup myth

Aberdeen Journal – Friday 30 June 1950
Image © D.C.Thomson & Co. Ltd. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page

 

240,000 extra newspaper pages now online

Posted on June 9th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Thousands of historical newspaper pages were added to The British Newspaper Archive in May, including three great new titles. We hope you enjoy exploring the new additions.
 

Search the newspapers
 

More newspaper titles available to search

You’ll now find editions of London’s Penny Illustrated Paper, the Dundee, Perth and Forfar People’s Journal and the Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate & Cheriton Herald online.

56 other titles were also updated, including the Aberdeen Journal, the Kent & Sussex Courier and the Morpeth Herald. A full list of recent additions is provided below.
 

The Penny Illustrated Post
 

Aberdeen Evening Express – 1910

Aberdeen Journal – 1799, 1803, 1805, 1809, 1812, 1815, 1821, 1823, 1825, 1846, 1849, 1852, 1853, 1854, 1855, 1856, 1864, 1869, 1875, 1876, 1877, 1878, 1879, 1880, 1881, 1882, 1883, 1884, 1885, 1887, 1890, 1891, 1896, 1899

Burnley Gazette – 1905, 1906

Cambridge Chronicle and Journal – 1861

Cheltenham Chronicle – 1854

Cheltenham Looker-On – 1844

Cheshire Observer – 1914, 1915, 1916, 1917

Chester Chronicle – 1790

Coventry Herald – 1863

Derbyshire Times and Chesterfield Herald – 1885, 1939, 1944

Dundee, Perth and Forfar People’s Journal – 1858, 1859, 1860, 1861

Durham County Advertiser – 1814

Edinburgh Evening News – 1916, 1919, 1923, 1931, 1942

Evening Telegraph – 1889, 1893

Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate & Cheriton Herald – 1913, 1915, 1924

Gloucester Citizen – 1939, 1943

Gloucester Journal – 1896, 1902, 1915

Grantham Journal – 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934

Hamilton Advertiser – 1914, 1915, 1916

Hartlepool Mail – 1899

Hastings and St Leonards Observer – 1943, 1944, 1945, 1946

Hull Daily Mail – 1888, 1910

Kent & Sussex Courier – 1895, 1896, 1898, 1899, 1917, 1921, 1924, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950

Lancashire Evening Post – 1889, 1890, 1907, 1909, 1921, 1929, 1932, 1938

Leamington Spa Courier – 1881, 1882, 1883, 1884, 1914, 1917, 1918

Leeds Intelligencer – 1813

Leeds Mercury – 1836, 1842, 1875, 1898

Leicestershire Mercury – 1836

Lichfield Mercury – 1879, 1880, 1881, 1882

Lincolnshire Chronicle – 1919, 1922

Lincolnshire Echo – 1931, 1933, 1934

Liverpool Daily Post – 1859

Luton Times and Advertiser – 1859, 1860, 1867, 1868, 1877, 1879, 1885, 1896, 1897, 1911

Maidstone Telegraph – 1861

Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser – 1889

Morpeth Herald – 1892, 1893, 1894, 1895, 1896, 1898, 1899, 1900, 1911, 1912, 1913, 1915, 1916, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954

North Devon Journal – 1897

Northampton Mercury – 1912

Nottingham Evening Post – 1913, 1938

Oxford Times – 1862

Penny Illustrated Paper – 1862, 1863, 1864, 1865, 1866, 1867, 1868, 1869, 1870

Portsmouth Evening News – 1939

Sheffield Daily Telegraph – 1886, 1888, 1895, 1899, 1910, 1911

Sheffield Evening Telegraph – 1889, 1907, 1912, 1914

Shields Daily Gazette – 1866, 1884, 1910

Southern Reporter – 1878

Staffordshire Sentinel – 1889, 1911

Sunday Post – 1914, 1915, 1917, 1918, 1919

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette – 1904, 1910, 1913, 1919, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1950, 1951, 1952

Surrey Mirror – 1880, 1889, 1900, 1901, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1945, 1946

Sussex Agricultural Express – 1877, 1883, 1911

Taunton Courier, and Western Advertiser – 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1943

West Briton and Cornwall Advertiser – 1939

Western Daily Press – 1886

Western Gazette – 1886, 1910, 1929

Western Morning News – 1894

Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald – 1905, 1906, 1907, 1908, 1909, 1911, 1912, 1913, 1914, 1915, 1916, 1917, 1922

Yorkshire Evening Post – 1906, 1943

Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer – 1869, 1873, 1880, 1881, 1906, 1926

 

70th anniversary of the D-Day landings

Posted on June 6th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Today we commemorate the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings.

On 6 June 1944, Allied forces invaded Normandy which was, at that point, occupied by the German Army. It is estimated that over 8,000 people lost their lives on this one day.

D-Day reported in British newspapers

News of the invasion reached British newspapers during the day on 6 June 1944, so you’ll find initial reports in late editions or in the copies published the following day.
 

Explore D-Day reports in local newspapers
 

Here’s a selection of newspaper headlines from the day of the D-Day landings.

Hull Daily Mail, 6 June 1944

 

Hull Daily Mail – Tuesday 06 June 1944
Image © Local World Limited. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page

 

Lancashire Daily Post, 6 June 1944

Lancashire Evening Post – Tuesday 06 June 1944
Image © Johnston Press plc. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page

 

Nottingham Evening Post, 6 June 1944

 

Nottingham Evening Post – Tuesday 06 June 1944
Image © Local World Limited. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page

The ‘Ocean Child’ and the sinking of the RMS Tayleur

Posted on June 5th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Gill Hoffs, author of The Sinking of RMS Tayleur: The Lost Story of the ‘Victorian Titanic’ used The British Newspaper Archive extensively for her research. She got in touch to tell us the touching story of the ‘Ocean Child’.

We’d love to hear about what you’ve discovered too – email press@britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk

 

**************

 

Sinking of RMS Tayleur by Gill HoffsPut simply, my book could not have been written without The British Newspaper Archive. 

The 1854 disaster made headlines around the world, but has since been largely forgotten. It was the subject of a massive cover-up and was then eclipsed by another shipwreck in 1912, the Titanic.

 

Discovering the victims of the disaster

 

Previous books and articles about the RMS Tayleur have focussed on the vessel itself, how the iron hull confused the compasses and contributed to the ship crashing into a cliff in the middle of the day. I wanted to let the unfortunate emigrants speak for themselves.

The accounts of the shipwreck in The British Newspaper Archive allowed me to read their words for myself and revealed the names of many of the hundreds on board.

I was then able to search for other mentions of them – important instances in their childhoods, what happened to the survivors afterwards, their births, marriages and deaths.

In one case, I even discovered what one of them looked like – the double of my own little boy – and his story made me cry.

 

‘Boy, about twelve months old’

 

Of the 70 children on board the Tayleur, only three survived. One was an anonymous baby nicknamed the ‘Ocean Child’ who was plucked from the wave-swept deck by an elderly man just before the ship sank.

In a time before cheap photographs, the enterprising reverend looking after the orphan placed a description in the newspapers. The child was described in the following way:

‘Boy, about twelve months old, unweaned, fine skin, blue eyes, dark eyelashes, light curly hair, square prominent forehead, two lower teeth, without any marks whatever on the body; of a lively affectionate disposition, and has apparently been much petted; supposed to belong to the middle classes’.

Description of the Ocean Child

Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette – Thursday 02 February 1854
Image © THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

View the whole newspaper page

 

Piecing together the Ocean Child’s story

 

It was incredible to be able to follow the newspaper reports and establish what happened to the child. The little boy was fostered for a month by Reverend Armstrong of 22 Herbert Place, Dublin before being reunited with his grandmother.

The detail in some accounts is amazing and very helpful for researchers:

The Ocean Child is reunited with his family

Dublin Evening Mail – Wednesday 22 February 1854
Image © THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

View the whole newspaper page

 

According to a reporter who visited little Arthur, he became ‘an object of attraction to visitors’.

Arthur Charles, the Ocean Child of the RMS Tayleur
Hereford Times – Saturday 04 March 1854
Image © THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

View the whole newspaper page

 

**************

Buy a copy of The Sinking of RMS Tayleur: The Lost Story of the ‘Victorian Titanic’ to read more about the tragedy and find out what happened to Arthur and the other survivors.

 

 

Marconi patents the radio

Posted on June 2nd, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Guglielmo Marconi applied for a patent for his new invention – the radio – on 2 June 1896. The British and Irish newspapers available online at The British Newspaper Archive reveal just how popular it became.

You can explore thousands of adverts for Marconi radios like these, published up until the 1950s.

Oh! Why don’t we get a Marconi?

 
Marconi advert in the Dover Express, 1936

Dover Express – Friday 16 October 1936
Image © Local World Limited. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page

 

The man behind your “Marconiphone”

 
Marconi advert in the Gloucestershire Echo, 1933

Gloucestershire Echo – Monday 20 February 1933
Image © Local World Limited. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page

 

There’s only one Radio good enough for you

 
Marconi advert in the Derby Daily Telegraph, 1935

Derby Daily Telegraph – Saturday 07 December 1935
Image © Local World Limited. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page

 

An escaped bear causes chaos in 1890

Posted on May 29th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

You’ll find lots of amusing stories in The British Newspaper Archive about the strange events that happened both in the United Kingdom and around the world.

A number of local newspapers, including the Grantham Journal, Portsmouth Evening News and Sheffield Evening Telegraph, reported on one such event in 1890.
 

Women shrieked and children cried

According to newspapers that are now available to search online, a huge brown bear interrupted a church service on Sunday 20 April 1890 after it escaped from a travelling showman.

 

A bear in chapel in 1890

 

Sheffield Evening Telegraph – Monday 21 April 1890
Image © THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

View the whole newspaper page

 

The Sheffield Evening Telegraph reported that the pulpit ‘suddenly became occupied by several lady members of the congregation desirous of ministerial protection’.

The bear, however, seemed unfazed by the commotion. He made his way to the choir stalls for a lie down and proceeded to ‘survey the surroundings with apparent satisfaction’.

 

What have you found?

Share the amusing stories you’ve found in the historical newspapers at The British Newspaper Archive. Either leave a comment below or email press@britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk to tell us what you’ve unearthed.
 

8 million newspaper pages are now fully searchable

Posted on May 16th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

We’re thrilled to announce that you can now explore 8 million historic newspaper pages online.

That’s double the number that you could search when The British Newspaper Archive launched in November 2011.

 

Search the newspapers

 

Try your search again

If you’ve tried searching for a person, event or place before without success, it’s well worth trying again now.

Thousands of pages are added every week, so your chance of finding something amazing increases all the time. So far this year, we’ve already added 825,000 new pages to the website.

 

The 8 millionth newspaper page

We hit our 8 million page milestone while adding editions of The Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer from 1873.

The newspaper published on Monday 1 September 1873 included this story about an earthquake that was felt in Nottingham:

Earthquake in Nottingham

The Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer – Monday 01 September 1873
Image © THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
View the whole newspaper page

 

Hull City play Arsenal in the 1930 FA Cup semi-final

Posted on May 13th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

The FA Cup final on Saturday 17 May 2014 will see a showdown between Arsenal and Hull City. This is the first time Hull have reached the final.

Hull City’s greatest achievement in cup competitions up to this point was in 1930, when they reached the semi-finals of the FA Cup. Rather strangely, they also faced Arsenal in that match.

The British Newspaper Archive is a great place to research football history as you’ll find original match reports and reactions to the games.
 
See Arsenal vs. Hull match reports

 

Hull City vs Arsenal in the FA Cup

Hull Daily Mail – Thursday 27 March 1930
Image © Local World Limited. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page
 

Hull City have lived up to their name of ‘the shockers’

Arsenal and Hull City initially drew 2-2, so the semi-final was replayed on 26 March 1930 at Villa Park, Birmingham. Judging by the newspaper accounts we’ve found, the replay was an exciting match to watch.

Though Arsenal clinched a 1-0 victory, the Dundee Courier reported that ‘Hull City have lived up to their name of “the shockers”.’ This was because Hull were only defeated by a single goal, even though they had a player sent off.
 
Hull City, the shockers

Dundee Courier – Thursday 27 March 1930
Image © D.C.Thomson & Co. Ltd. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page
 

The goal that dashed Hull City’s cup hopes

Arsenal took the lead early on, with David Jack scoring in the 11th minute of the game. The Hull Daily Mail printed this photo of David Jack’s winning goal:
 
Arsenal goal scored by David Jack

Hull Daily Mail – Thursday 27 March 1930
Image © Local World Limited. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page
 

There was much indiscriminate kicking

Hull City’s centre half, Arthur Childs, was sent off at the beginning of the second half for kicking an Arsenal player. He was the first football player ever to be sent off in a semi-final.

The Exeter and Plymouth Gazette’s write-up of the match mentioned that ‘Hull City’s vigorous tackling lowered the standard of play, and there was much indiscriminate kicking’.
 
Arthur Childs was sent off

Exeter and Plymouth Gazette – Thursday 27 March 1930
Image © Local World Limited. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page
 

Never heard such continuous booing before on a football ground

The Hull Daily Mail reported a very different version of the sending off. The newspaper commented that no one but the referee seemed to have any idea of what Childs was supposed to have been guilty of.

The journalist stated that ‘for the remainder of the game, the official in charge got no peace from a crowd that obviously resented his action. I have never heard such continuous booing before on a football ground’.
 
Childs is sent off during the semi-final

Hull Daily Mail – Thursday 27 March 1930
Image © Local World Limited. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page

 

Arsenal went on to face Huddersfield Town in the final at Wembley, winning 2-0. You can find original match reports from the FA Cup final and thousands of other football games at The British Newspaper Archive.

 

Search for football match reports
 
 

300,000 newspaper pages added, including the Daily Mirror

Posted on May 9th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

The British Newspaper Archive added 300,000 new pages to the website last month, including six brand new titles.
 
Search the newspapers
 

You can now search editions of the Daily Mirror (the national newspaper), Hamilton Advertiser, The Lancashire Evening Post, The Oxford Times, Perthshire Advertiser and The Shetland Times. A full list of recent additions is provided below.

There’s never been a better time to subscribe to The British Newspaper Archive, especially as you can now access all of these newspapers with our new 1 month subscription for just £9.95.

 

Daily Mirror

 

Aberdeen Evening Express – 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954

Aberdeen Journal – 1844, 1845, 1847, 1848, 1851, 1858, 1859, 1860, 1861, 1862, 1863, 1865, 1866, 1867, 1868, 1870, 1871, 1872, 1873, 1874, 1876, 1886, 1888, 1893, 1894, 1895, 1898, 1903

Arbroath Herald and Advertiser for the Montrose Burghs – 1889

Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette – 1800, 1803, 1807, 1808, 1811, 1813, 1863

Birmingham Daily Mail, The – 1914, 1916, 1917

Birmingham Daily Post – 1914, 1915, 1916, 1917, 1918

Birmingham Gazette – 1918

Birmingham Journal – 1832, 1833, 1834, 1835, 1836, 1838

Bradford Observer – 1866, 1867

Burnley Express – 1905, 1906

Burnley Gazette – 1902

Cambridge Independent Press – 1871, 1873, 1875, 1876, 1877, 1878, 1879, 1880, 1881, 1882, 1883, 1884, 1885, 1886, 1887, 1888, 1889, 1890, 1891, 1892, 1894, 1895, 1898, 1900, 1901, 1902, 1903, 1904, 1905, 1906, 1907, 1908, 1909, 1910, 1914, 1915, 1916, 1917, 1918, 1919, 1920

Cheltenham Chronicle – 1887, 1930

Chester Chronicle – 1775, 1811

Chester Courant – 1825, 1826, 1827, 1828, 1829

Coventry Herald – 1890, 1891, 1893, 1894, 1895, 1896, 1899, 1900, 1901, 1902, 1903, 1904, 1905, 1907

Daily Gazette for Middlesbrough – 1914, 1915, 1916, 1918

Daily Mirror – 1915

Derby Mercury – 1848

Derbyshire Times and Chesterfield Herald – 1862

Dover Express – 1898, 1950

Dublin Evening Mail – 1831, 1833, 1840, 1842

Dundee Advertiser – 1863

Durham County Advertiser, The – 1844

Edinburgh Evening News – 1894

Evening Despatch – 1914, 1916

Evening Telegraph – 1881

Falkirk Herald – 1866

Gloucester Citizen – 1911, 1922

Gloucester Journal – 1793, 1795, 1796

Grantham Journal – 1928

Hamilton Advertiser – 1917, 1918

Hartlepool Mail – 1881

Hastings and St Leonards Observer – 1942, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1951, 1952

Lancashire Evening Post, The – 1887, 1888, 1891, 1892, 1893, 1895, 1896, 1897, 1899, 1900, 1902, 1904, 1905, 1908, 1918, 1919, 1920, 1933, 1935, 1937, 1940, 1944, 1946

Leamington Spa Courier – 1839

Liverpool Daily Post – 1915, 1916, 1917, 1918

Manchester Courier, and Lancashire General Advertiser – 1898

Morpeth Herald – 1914, 1917, 1918

Newcastle Daily Journal and Courant – 1917

Oxford Times, The – 1863, 1864, 1865, 1866, 1867, 1868, 1869, 1870

Perthshire Advertiser – 1914, 1915, 1916, 1917

Portsmouth Evening News – 1938

Sheffield Daily Telegraph – 1865, 1891, 1892

Sheffield Evening Telegraph – 1906, 1908, 1910, 1913, 1915, 1916, 1918

Shetland Times, The – 1872, 1885

Shields Daily Gazette – 1871, 1874

Southern Reporter – 1858, 1928, 1929

Stamford Mercury – 1746, 1829

Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette – 1911, 1935, 1936, 1937

Sussex Agricultural Express, The – 1892, 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1924, 1925, 1931, 1932, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1951, 1953

Western Gazette – 1876, 1877

Wiltshire Independent – 1836, 1845

Yorkshire Evening Post – 1913, 1942, 1944, 1952

Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer, The – 1867, 1893, 1909, 1923, 1925

Roger Bannister and the four-minute mile

Posted on May 6th, 2014 by The British Newspaper Archive

Roger Bannister became the first man to run a mile in under four minutes on 6 May 1954.

You can search British newspapers from 1954 online at The British Newspaper Archive, so we took a look to see how the incredible feat was reported.

 

‘Something typically British about this new world record’

The Aberdeen Evening Express published an article about Roger Bannister the following day, proudly stating that ‘Britain’s great mile-runner has achieved the ambition of all athletes; he has broken the four-minute mile barrier’.

 

Roger Bannister's four-minute mile

Aberdeen Evening Express – Friday 07 May 1954
Image © D.C.Thomson & Co. Ltd. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

View the whole newspaper page

 

The newspaper went on to describe how the 25-year-old returned to his university, the University of Oxford, to create the new world record. He was watched by ‘an excited but not demonstrative small crowd of about 1000… There were no bands, no cheer-leaders; there was no super-stadium packed with thousands of roaring supporters’.

 

Read more newspaper reports about Roger Bannister

We make every single word searchable when we put historical newspapers online at The British Newspaper Archive, so you can search for absolutely anything.

 

Search the newspapers for Roger Bannister