India – The British Newspaper Archive Blog

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Sunetra Sarker explores her Indian heritage

This week’s episode of Who Do You Think You Are? took us to India and Bangladesh with Sunetra Sarker.  During the program, Sarker became familiar with her Indian ancestors and learned how the tragedies of war affected her family.  With the use of newspapers, Sarker was able to place her ancestors into the context of public events and gain a deeper understanding of the lives they led. At the beginning of the episode, Sunetra conveys a feeling most of us

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The Homeward Mail – News from the East

The British Newspaper Archive brings you news from India, China, and further East during the height of the British Empire.  The Homeward Mail from India, China and the East was first published in 1857 by Messrs. Smith, Elder, & Co. and provided Britain with news from its colonies in the East.  The publishing company also produced the first Dictionary of National Biography and worked with major authors such as Charlotte Brontë, George Eliot, Alfred Tennyson, and Arthur Conan Doyle.  Along

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Liz Bonnin’s Presbyterian connections in Trinidad

Last night, during Who Do You Think You Are? we searched through Liz Bonnin’s family tree and discovered her Indian and French heritage. This week’s episode opened with gorgeous views of a sun soaked beach and crashing waves, making us all envious as we watched by our fires and with hot cups of tea in our hands.  The first part of the episode took us to Bonnin’s mother’s home in Trinidad to find more clues about Liz’s Indian ancestors. Early

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A. E. J. Collins and the highest recorded cricket score

A 13-year-old schoolboy has held the record for the highest cricket score for over 100 years. Arthur Edward Jeune ‘James’ Collins, also known by the initials A. E. J. Collins, scored an incredible 628 not out in June 1899. The cricket match took place over four days at Clifton College in Bristol.   Blackburn Standard reports a score of ‘628 not out’ A copy of the Blackburn Standard printed on 1 July 1899 reveals that Collins achieved the majority of

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The ‘new game of badminton’ in India

Did you know that badminton originated in India? Versions of the game had been played by local children for years and it was adopted by British military officers stationed there. We’ve found this charming illustration of ‘the new game of badminton in India’, printed in The Graphic in 1874: View the whole newspaper page The Graphic – Saturday 25 April 1874 Image © THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.   British in India family history records If you’re interested in

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An aquatic tea party

The first shipments of tea arrived in Britain from India 175 years ago today. You’ll find numerous adverts and articles about tea in The British Newspaper Archive, including this charming illustration of an aquatic tea party in 1881: View the whole newspaper page The Graphic – Saturday 22 October 1881 Image © THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

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