BNA – The British Newspaper Archive Blog

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Hot Off The Press – New Titles This Week

This week we have added 94,482 new pages to The Archive, covering 123 years of history across the British Isles and Ireland. We have updated seven of our existing titles, with significant updates to Newcastle publication the Newcastle Daily Chronicle, to which we have added over 60,000 pages spanning the years 1870-1914. We also have significant updates to society publication The Queen, as we continue to augment our early twentieth-century holdings for this newspaper. We have added pages to regional titles covering the North West

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Hot Off The Press – New Titles This Week

This week we have added 123,844 brand new pages to The Archive. We are delighted to have added four new Scottish titles to our collection, as we continue to augment our holdings for Scotland. We have two new titles covering the Moray area, namely the Forres News and Advertiser and the Northern Scot and Moray & Nairn Express. Our third new Scottish newspaper is the Renfrewshire Independent, for which we have so far published the years 1858 to 1877. Our final new addition this week is

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Hot Off The Press – New Titles This Week

This week we have added 113,770 pages to The Archive, with the inclusion of several brand new Scottish titles such as the Dalkeith Advertiser, the Banffshire Advertiser, the Hawick Express (pronounced “Hoick”!), and the Coatbridge Express. The years we’ve added to the Coatbridge Express expose a time in distinct contrast to the quaint and bright North Lanarkshire town you’ll see today – or, indeed, you would have seen in the 18th century before the town became one of the primary mining towns in industrialist Scotland. Lush forest and greenery paved

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‘The Most Remarkable, Invigorating, and Enjoyable Holiday You Will Ever Have’ – The Holiday Camp Phenomenon

By 1939 there were an estimated three to four hundred holiday camps established across the United Kingdom, with the smallest housing fifty beds, and the largest with six thousand or more. What was behind the surge in popularity? We explore the holiday camp phenomenon by delving into the pages of the British Newspaper Archive, using the myriad of advertisements, photographs and articles located there to discover more about this mainstay of the British seaside resort. In 1936 William ‘Billy’ Butlin

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‘Brighton – For Health and Pleasure’ – The History of a Seaside Resort

‘What Pompeii was to the Romans…Brighton is to Londoners,’ comments an article on the famous British seaside town in the Penny Illustrated Paper, 10 August 1889. Using articles, photographs and illustrations from The Archive, in this special blog we will take a look at the history of this ‘Queen of Watering-places,’ from its establishment as a health resort in the eighteenth century, its growth as a fashionable destination thanks to the Prince Regent, to its railway heyday, and its infamous

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Hot Off The Press – New Titles This Week

This week we are delighted to have passed the fantastic milestone of 33 million pages on The Archive, with 90,812 new pages added over the last seven days. That means we now have over 33 million pages available to search – and keep your eyes peeled as this number continues to grow and grow! We have updated six of our existing titles this week. There are extensive twentieth century additions to both the Aberdeen Press & Journal and the Aberdeen Evening Express. We

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‘Nothing Else But Cricket Matches All Summer’ – A Look at Cricket in the 1730s

Performing a search for cricket in our oldest British Newspaper Archive publications (the Archive’s earliest pages run from 1700) it is possible to discover the fascinating history of the enduringly popular sport. In this special blog we will look at cricket’s early association with royalty, its emergence as a gambling sport, and its inevitable explosion in popularity. Kentish Gazette | 23 June 1773 An early and passionate advocate for the sport was Prince Frederick of Wales, father of George III, who

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Hot Off The Press – New Titles This Week

This week we have added 102,572 new pages to The Archive, and we continue to add brand new and exciting titles to our collection. This week sees the addition of new title The Queen to The Archive. The Queen, or to give it its full title, The Queen, The Ladies’ Newspaper and Court Chronicle was established as a society magazine by Samuel Beeton in 1861, and followed the goings-on of high society and the British aristocracy. We currently have the years 1887 to 1896

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Single versus Married Ladies – Women’s Cricket in the 1800s

The first recorded mention of women’s cricket was in 1745, in Surrey. We searched our Archive for early mentions of women’s cricket, and we came across a treasure trove of articles describing the early history of the sport. Harrow versus Pinner | Graphic | 18 August 1888 One of these comes from the Sherborne Mercury, published in August 1849. It describes a match between ‘nine married ladies’ and ‘nine single ladies’ played at Picket Post, in the New Forest. The single ladies

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Hot Off The Press – New Titles This Week

This week we have added 116,100 new pages to The Archive, and we are delighted to welcome five very special new newspapers to our collection. Three of these newspapers are early socialist publications, which trace the origins of the Labour party movement, including the election of the first Labour government in 1924 and beyond. These titles are Forward (Glasgow), the Labour Leader and Clarion. Later on in the blog we will take an in depth look at these titles, which are a must read for

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