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The Tay Bridge Disaster, 28 December 1879

Tay Bridge Disaster 1880

‘The awful catastrophe which occurred at the Tay Bridge on the last Sunday of the year is still the all-absorbing theme of conversation in the community…’ A section of the Tay Bridge, which connects Dundee and Wormit in Fife, collapsed during a terrible storm on the night of 28 December 1879.  Tragically, a Dundee-bound train plunged into the freezing waters of the river, with the loss of 60 lives (although some estimate the loss to have been 75 lives). Graphic illustrated the scenes

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Sir Thomas Lipton, tea tycoon – died on 2 October 1931

‘Errand boy who became a millionaire’   Sir Thomas Johnstone Lipton, the Glasgow-born self-made man who worked himself up from errand boy to become a millionaire, died in London on 2 October 1931 – he was 81.   Below is a newspaper report (published the day after his death) that offers an overview of Lipton’s amazing life and achievements.     This image of Sir Lipton, shows him in the uniform of the City Lieutenancy.   Discover more about Sir Lipton

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Harold Mahony: until Sunday 7 July 2013, the last Scot to win a Wimbledon men’s singles title (July 1896)

We were fascinated by this news story about Harold Mahony, who won the men’s singles at Wimbledon in 1896. Born in Edinburgh in 1869 (we think the 1867 in the news story is a typo), Mahony was twice a semi-finalist at Wimbledon in 1891 and 1892, before finally winning the championship in 1896. As he was born to Irish parents (from Dublin), Mahony was clearly a mix of Scottishness and Irishness – so Ireland might claim him as an Irish

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Robert Burns – Born in Alloway, South Ayrshire, on 25 January 1759

Robert Burns on thrift

To celebrate the birthday of Robert Burns, we found a newspaper article from 1796 reporting on the life, death, and funeral of Scotland’s Bard and ‘peasant poet’ (hmm, it can be debated if he was a ‘heaven-taught ploughman’, as we suspect he read quite a bit whenever he had time!). As two of Burns’s most famous lines are: O wad some Pow’r the giftie gie us To see oursels as ithers see us!

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