Archive for May, 2013

A Ball-Room Etiquette Guide from the Victorian Era

Posted on May 23rd, 2013 by The British Newspaper Archive

We’re BIG fans of etiquette – in all its glorious forms and contexts – at the BNA. Indeed, we often think that folk who are keen to maintain high standards of decorum and refined behaviour are ‘keepers of the flame’ for, er, well, the survival of civilisation, really. Anyway, we’ve now published a fair few etiquette guides […]

Change in days for ‘Who Do You Think You Are? Live 2014′ – THURSDAY, Friday and Saturday

Posted on May 23rd, 2013 by The British Newspaper Archive

As there might well be some very organised folk (grr!) out there who are already planning or musing on their 2014 calendar, we thought we’d best mention that the days for ‘Who Do You Think You Are? Live 2014′ will be THURSDAY, Friday and Saturday – so the show will not include the Sunday in […]

Taking a Bear for a Stroll in Hull – December 1929

Posted on May 23rd, 2013 by The British Newspaper Archive

We do love the quirky stories in the Archive, where the UK’s eccentrics get up to all sorts of weird, wonderful and amusing larks – indeed, some of the stories are bearly believable. Here’s a grand photo of a lady who took her bear for a stroll in Hull in December 1929. Hull Daily Mail […]

Bonnie and Clyde Are Killed in a Police Ambush – 23 May 1934

Posted on May 22nd, 2013 by The British Newspaper Archive

On a rural road in Bienville Parish, Louisiana, on 23 May 1934, Bonnie Elizabeth Parker and Clyde Chestnut Barrow were shot dead in a police ambush. The couple were criminal celebrities during the ‘public enemy era’ in the USA, from between 1931 and 1934. It’s believed that they killed nine police officers and several civilians during […]

The Bicentenary of Richard Wagner – Born in Leipzig on 22 May 1813

Posted on May 22nd, 2013 by The British Newspaper Archive

Wilhelm Richard Wagner was born in Leipzig on 22 May 1813. As you can imagine of somebody who led such a dramatic and turbulent life, there are 100s of interesting stories about Wagner in the Archive. Indeed, you can trace the course of much of Wagner’s life simply by reading old newspaper stories about him […]

The Capture of Jefferson Davis – Irwinville, Georgia, 22 May 1865

Posted on May 21st, 2013 by The British Newspaper Archive

On 22 May 1865 in Irwinville, Georgia, the fugitive president of the Confederacy, Jefferson Davis, was captured by the Union cavalry officer Benjamin Dudley Pritchard. Historical legend has it that Davis was disguised as a woman when he was arrested, hence the reference in this newspaper report (published in June 1865) to ‘the petticoat story’ […]

Amelia Earhart Flies Solo Across the Atlantic – 21 May 1932

Posted on May 20th, 2013 by The British Newspaper Archive

On 21 May 1932, Amelia Earhart landed in a field at Culmore, near Derry in Northern Ireland, after flying solo across the Atlantic – she was the first woman to achieve this amazing feat. Here are some contemporary newspaper stories about her historic flight – we especially like that she set off on her epic […]

The Death of Clara Schumann – 20 May 1896

Posted on May 19th, 2013 by The British Newspaper Archive

‘This child has a great future before her, and she will put many great musicians in the shade’ – Paganini The German pianist and composer, Clara Schumann, suffered a stroke and died in Frankfurt on 20 May 1896, aged 76. We’ve been reading stories about Madame Schumann in the Archive and we especially liked this first […]

The Death of ‘Lawrence of Arabia’ – 19 May 1935

Posted on May 18th, 2013 by The British Newspaper Archive

On 19 May 1935, T.E. Lawrence (‘Lawrence of Arabia’) died at Bovington Military Camp in Dorset, five days after fracturing his skull in a motorcycle accident – he was 46 years old. The Archive contains 100s of stories about Thomas Edward Lawrence, including many reports of his amazing exploits during World War One. Here is […]

When Corporate Sponsorship of the Arts Goes Awry: Nelson Rockefeller v Diego Rivera, The Rockfeller Center, New York, May 1933

Posted on May 17th, 2013 by The British Newspaper Archive

We were very interested in this quirky story about the removal of a controversial mural from the RCA Building in New York in 1933. The Mexican artist, Diego Rivera had been commissioned by Nelson Rockefeller to paint a mural in the RCA Building, which was the centrepoint of the Rockefeller Center. The painting, entitled ‘Man at the […]