Headlines from History – The British Newspaper Archive Blog

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‘Women Personators’ – The 1871 Trial of Boulton and Park

In 1870 Ernest ‘Stella’ Boulton and Frederick ‘Fanny’ Park were arrested, charged with ‘conspiring and inciting persons to commit an unnatural offence.’ The case caused a sensation; for, when arrested, Boulton and Park were wearing women’s clothes. From Bow Street Station to the Van, April 10th, 1870 | The Days’ Doings | 20 May 1871 In this special blog, we take a look at this landmark trial and important chapter in LGBTQ history, and how it was reported at the time in

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Highlights of the Week on The Archive

This week at The Archive we are going global, bringing you a prince’s 50,000 mile journey across the world, as well as highlighting one of our favourite newspapers, The Sphere. Read on to discover more about The Sphere, as well as the Prince of Wales’s world tour of 1920.   Register now and explore the Archive Newspaper of the Week The Sphere, or The Sphere: An Illustrated Newspaper for the Home began in London, just as the twentieth century dawned. Published weekly, The Sphere abounded with illustrations

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Highlights of the Week on The Archive

This week on The Archive we continue to bring you our top picks from our collection of specialist, national and regional newspapers. And in this vein, we turn our spotlight this week onto our very special suffragist newspapers, which chart how women across the British Isles and Ireland campaigned for the vote. Register now and explore the Archive Newspaper of The Week One of the most iconic of these titles is The Suffragette, later renamed Britannia. This newspaper was established in 1912,

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Highlights of the Week on The Archive

This week we are continuing to bring you the best of what The Archive has to offer – and this week’s highlights have a particularly nautical flavour. For this week marks 200 years since HMS Beagle was launched, the famous ship upon which naturalist Charles Darwin travelled, and later wrote about, his experiences on the voyage helping to form his theory of evolution. Charles Darwin | Illustrated London News | 1 April 1982 Read on to discover how we used The Archive to retrace

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Women and the Second World War

Continuing our commemoration of the 75 years since VE-Day, in this special blog we explore the vital role that women played throughout the course of the Second World War. In 1939, for a second time in just over twenty years, Britain found itself embroiled in an international conflict, and women stepped forward to work in civil defence, armed forces, and industry.  Unlike any other country, for the first time, British women were conscripted into service.  On 18 December 1941, the

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Highlights of the Week on The Archive

This week we are delighted to bring you some very special highlights from The Archive. We are diving into our immense collection to bring you our choice of ‘Newspaper of the Week,’ as well as uncovering headlines from the past. Register now and explore the Archive Newspaper of the Week This week’s pick for newspaper of the week is one of our more well known titles, namely the Illustrated London News. The Illustrated London News ran for over 160 years, and was one

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Bonfires and Prayers – Headlines from VE Day, 8 May 1945

This month marks the 75th anniversary of VE Day – the day that peace in Europe was finally declared. After nearly six years of conflict – how did the newspapers of the time report the momentous news? How did the people of Britain react? Gloucestershire Echo | 8 May 1945 Using the front pages from the 8 May 1945, VE Day itself, we take a step back in time to discover just how the joyous news spread, and how it was

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Hot Off The Press – New Titles This Week

This week we have added 68,516 brand new pages to The Archive, covering an astounding 166 years of history, as well as three countries and two continents. We have one brand new title joining us this week, namely the Bombay Gazette, as well as updates to five of our existing titles. Register now and explore the Archive The Bombay Gazette provides a sobering record of British colonial governance in India. Founded in 1789, it was initially known as the Bombay Herald and was Bombay’s first

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Hippies in Piccadilly – The Events of September 1969

In September 1969, 144 Piccadilly, a mansion in London’s fashionable West End, was taken over by a group of hippies who called themselves the London Street Commune. Over several days, the hippies barricaded themselves in the mansion, and resisted attempts to remove them, in what became known as the Battle of Piccadilly. Hippies occupy Endell Street School, Holborn | Illustrated London News | 4 October 1969 In this special blog, we look at how the newspapers of the time reported on this

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Hooligans and Gangsters? A Look at the Teddy Boys of the 1950s

‘…coloured velvet collars and cuffs, trousers that were so tight they couldn’t sit down in them, belts on the back of their jackets, long narrow ties like bootlaces,’  this is of course the style of the Teddy Boys, the British youth subculture which defined the 1950s, as described in the Londonderry Sentinel. The Sphere | 22 September 1956 The Teddy Boys, embracing the Edwardian style of decades before, were a threat to the status quo in a way that Britain had never quite

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