The British Newspaper Archive Blog – Amazing finds and news from over 300 years of historical newspapers

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Metro-land Magic – How the Metropolitan Railway Shaped the Growth of London’s Suburbs

I know a land where the wild flowers grow Near, near at hand if by train you go, Metro-land. Metro-land. The above pre-First World War verse written by George R Sims coined the phrase ‘Metro-land’ – that area of north west of Wembley served by what was then called the Metropolitan Railway, and is now known as the Metropolitan Line. In this blog, using articles found on the British Newspaper Archive, we will explore how the Metropolitan Railway shaped London’s

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Hot Off The Press – New Titles This Week

This week we have added 93,860 new pages to The Archive. We have one brand new title joining us this week – the Banffshire Reporter – as well as updates to thirteen of our English and Scottish titles. Published in Portsoy, Aberdeenshire, the Banffshire Reporter was a weekly local newspaper founded by Thomas Anderson. Anderson ‘mastered the art of printing after he reached middle life,’ and printed several newspapers in the Portsoy area. Upon his retirement the Banffshire Reporter was sold to the Calder Brothers

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The Murder of Countess Teresa Lubienska – An Unsolved Underground Mystery

Reading like a 1950s noire novel, or a Cold War thriller from the pen of John le Carré, the murder of Polish aristocrat Countess Teresa Lubienska on the platform of Gloucester Road Underground station shocked the nation, and provoked a massive man hunt that saw 18,000 people interviewed over the following months. Belfast Telegraph | 25 May 1957 Using contemporary articles found in the British Newspaper Archive, we explore the circumstances of Countess Lubienska’s murder, the possible motives behind her killing,

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Hot Off The Press – New Titles This Week

This week at The Archive we have added nearly 200,000 new pages to our collection, covering England, Scotland and Ireland. To be precise, 193,470 brand new pages have joined us this week, with updates to 21 of our existing titles. We have updates to eleven of our English titles this week, covering the length and breadth of the country, from Devon (Express and Echo) to Newcastle (Newcastle Daily Chronicle), from Staffordshire (Staffordshire Sentinel) to London (Hammersmith & Shepherds Bush Gazette). A particular highlight this week includes

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The Blitz and The London Underground – Safety Beneath the Streets in the Second World War

When the Blitz began on 7 September 1940, ‘It was the people of London who took command…Men, women, and children went straight to the safest place they could think of – the Underground stations.’ In this special blog, over 79 years after the beginning of the Blitz, we take a look at how London’s main transport system – the Underground –  became a popular place of shelter for those seeking protection from the German bombing campaign, using an assortment of

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Hot Off The Press – New Titles This Week

This week is another bumper week for new and updated titles on The Archive, as we have added another 115,438 brand new pages to our site. We are delighted to welcome five new titles to our ever-expanding collection, and on top of this, we have additions to thirteen of our existing titles. We continue to augment our Scottish holdings this week, our five new titles all hailing from north of the border. Our earliest publication this week is the Fifeshire Journal, which was

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The Opening of the Metropolitan Railway – 10 January 1863

On 10 January 1863 the Metropolitan Railway was opened in London. An unprecedented feat of engineering, the Metropolitan Railway was the first underground railway in the world, forming the basis of the London underground and other global underground systems. In this special blog, we take a look at the historic first three days of the Metropolitan Railway’s existence, from its grand opening on Friday 10 January 1863, to the teething problems it encountered when it opened to the public on

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Hot Off The Press – New Titles This Week

This week we have added 66,564 new pages to The Archive, with two brand new titles joining us this week, as well as updates to seven of our existing titles. Our two new titles this week have a particularly Highland flavour. With this in mind, we are delighted to welcome the Huntly Express to our ever-growing collection of Scottish titles. The Huntly Express is a weekly newspaper covering local events, and initially started life as a Saturday publication. The town of Huntly was formerly known as Milton

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Ninette de Valois – Godmother of English and Irish Ballet

Prima ballerina, choreographer, teacher and business woman, Irish born Dame Ninette de Valois was instrumental in raising the global profile of British ballet, founding the company that would become the Royal Ballet, and nurturing the talent of some of the country’s most famous dancers, including Alicia Markova and Margot Fonteyn. In this special blog, we take a look at de Valois’ early years, her rise to prima ballerina, and her shift into production and choreography, using pages from the British

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Hot Off The Press – New Titles This Week

This week we have added 130,418 new pages to The Archive, including one brand new title the Strathearn Herald. A weekly newspaper published on Saturdays, we have so far added over 30,000 pages to this title and counting, with over 123 years of comprehensive coverage. Strathearn Herald | 11 April 1863 We have also updated six of our existing Scottish titles, with significant updates to the Arbroath Guide, a weekly local newspaper which began publication in 1843, as well as to the Perthshire Constitutional and

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