Search Results for “military newspapers” – The British Newspaper Archive Blog

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Military Newspapers

As we explored in our other blog post, military topics and history can be found in every newspaper in The Archive. We also hold a range of specialist military titles.  These titles fall into three broad categories: newspapers aimed at the volunteer and military services, newspapers from towns which had large military or naval bases, and newspapers published during the course of a conflict. Click on each paper’s title to be brought to its Title Page in the table below. 

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Researching Military History in Newspapers

History was once dominated by ‘great men’ and ‘great battles’.  Today we can tell a far more nuanced story about the impact of warfare on nations and communities.  Newspapers can help to tell that story.  The papers in The Archive stretch back to the early 1700s and into the 2000s and can be used to research many famous, and forgotten, conflicts. Throughout November we will explore a variety of topics related to the history of conflict and the military services. The

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Irish Newspapers for Genealogy Research

Anyone starting to research their Irish heritage has heard the story: ‘all of their records were destroyed in 1922’.  The destruction of the Four Courts on 30 June 1922, which housed the public records office, was a huge loss… but! with digitisation, Irish family history is getting easier by the day.  Sites like our sister site Findmypast are opening up new avenues of research by digitising a wide variety of sources, and many of their Irish collections are free! Newspapers

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Guest post: Researching military ancestors in The British Newspaper Archive

Researching military ancestors in The British Newspaper Archive As part of our military themed month, we are delighted to bring you a guest blog post by military researcher Paul Nixon.  Paul is the author of the blogs Army Ancestry Research and Army Service Numbers 1881-1918.  He has also recently launched a new endeavour, British Army Ancestors, a database of over 11 million men who served their monarch and country between 1850 and 1920 and a resource which enables visitors to

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Headlines from History – November military events

American troops

In honour of Remembrance Day, during the month of November, The British Newspaper Archive will be focusing our attention on military in the newspapers.  Coming up this month we will feature blogs about our special military titles, researching military history, women and war, and wartime rationing and fashion, as well as a guest blog about a remarkable Great War discovery from The Archive.  To begin our military month, we are delving into the newspaper headlines through the years for the

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Employment and Occupation History in the Newspapers

Discover more about specific occupations, industries and the history of working conditions and employment regulations in our historic newspapers.  In towns and villages across Britain and Ireland people plied their trades, from carters and hawkers, to seamstresses and tailors.  As the centuries passed agriculture gave way to industry and the ‘factory-worker’ was born.  Read our blog to discover more about the history of work & occupations. Of Cordwainers, Chandlers & Night-Soil Men There are some historic occupations that are no

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Newspapers for Family History

Newspapers are an invaluable resource for researching your family history. Contained within their pages are tens of millions of reports, advertisements, and notices that can help you break down brick walls and tell richer stories about your ancestors. The Archive works with the British Library and publishers to bring you 300 years of newspapers from the UK and Ireland.  Get the most out of our historical newspapers with these hints and tips. What newspapers do we have? We add more

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Cheryl’s Maritime and Military Ancestors

In this week’s episode of Who Do You Think We Are?, we found out about Cheryl’s four times great-grandfather, John Wood Laing, who was born in Newcastle towards the end of the Industrial Revolution. At the age of 19, he became a mariner’s apprentice and, ten years into his career, became a master, or captain. Since Newcastle was a shipbuilding hub at the time, it was not surprising to discover that there was a branch of mariners in Cheryl’s family

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The Easter Rising: As documented in the British newspapers, 1916

Next month sees the marking of the 100th anniversary of the Easter Rising. Irish nationalists headed a campaign to end British rule in Ireland during a time when the outcome of World War 1 was uncertain. We take a look at how the events of 1916 were documented in the British press at the time. Search the newspapers News of the Rising started to filter through to the British newspapers on Tuesday, 25 April 1916. A smattering of local papers managed to

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The missing men of Singapore: Remembering the “worst disaster” of British military history

From the 8th to the 15th February 1942, the Empire of Japan invaded Singapore, one of Britain’s largest military bases in the South East. The move, that would see 85,000 British, Australian and Indian troops taken prisoner of war, was dubbed the “worst disaster” in British military history by Winston Churchill. Search the newspapers Back in Britain, the newspapers were filled with reports of missing troops and families appealing for information. Many of these men had been taken prisoner, but

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