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Hot Off The Press – New Titles This Week

We are delighted this week at The Archive to have reached yet another milestone, as we’ve reached 55 million pages, just under fourth months since we reached 50 million pages in April. Furthermore, we’ve added an incredible 308,283 brand new pages to our newspaper collection, with four brand new titles joining us this week, which hail from London and the Caribbean, and also include a specialist religious title. Meanwhile, we’ve updated an amazing 57 of our existing titles this week, with updates to our newspapers from across the world, from Birmingham to Barbados, from Ealing to Ellesmere

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Hot Off The Press – New Titles This Week

Over the past seven days here at The Archive we have been busy adding 131,994 brand new pages to our collection, as we continue to augment our newspaper holdings from across Britain, Ireland, and beyond. This week we’re delighted to welcome one brand new title from London, the Lewisham Borough News, as well as updates to twelve of our existing titles. So read on to discover more about all of our new and updated titles of the week, and as the United Kingdom basks in unusually hot

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‘War Scars’ – Living With Bomb Sites in 1950s Britain

In the decade after the Second World War had come to an end, and indeed beyond, many communities across the United Kingdom were faced with very vivid reminders of the conflict: bomb sites, the country’s ‘war scars.’ In this blog, we will examine how people in Britain lived alongside bomb sits in the 1950s, using newspapers taken from The Archive. We will explore how communities adapted to live beside bomb sites, and how they transformed them into gardens and playgrounds.

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Exploring The Notting Hill Race Riots of 1958

In late August and early September 1958, the London area of Notting Hill was the scene of racially motivated riots, in which white, working-class, ‘Teddy Boys,’ and others, displayed hostility and violence to the Black community in the area. These riots took place ten years after HMT Empire Windrush arrived in Tilbury Docks, carrying 492 Caribbean migrants. Since that moment in history, more and more migrants arrived in Britain from the Caribbean, and they would come to be known as the ‘Windrush Generation.’

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Hot Off The Press – New Titles This Week

This week at The Archive we have added an amazing 293,242 brand new pages, with 29 brand new titles joining us from Scotland, Wales and eighteen English counties. Meanwhile, we have also been busy attending to our existing titles, with 60 of these updated in all over the past seven days. With all these brand new pages added to The Archive, we now have over 48 million pages available to search, with the milestone of 50 million pages on the horizon. So read on to discover more about all

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The Croydon Typhoid Epidemic of 1937

In late 1937 in the borough of Croydon, South London, people began to fall ill with typhoid. Typhoid is a disease that is associated with contaminated water and outbreaks of the illness, at least in the United Kingdom, is something that we might associate today with the nineteenth century, before an age of improved sanitation and safe supplies of drinking water. And so, in this special blog, we will take a look at how the Croydon typhoid epidemic gradually unfolded, as

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Selfridges Steps Out – The Opening of a Department Store As Told By Our Newspapers

This December, we have been looking at the history of shopping, and no history of shopping would be complete without looking at the one of London’s most iconic department stores – Selfridges. The brainchild of American entrepreneur, Harry Gordon Selfridge (1858-1947), the Oxford Street department store was opened on 15 March 1909, to great fanfare. And in this special blog, we will look at the opening of ‘London’s biggest shop,’ and how the opening was reported in the newspapers to

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‘The Girls Behind the Counter’ – The Daily Life of a Victorian Shop Girl

In November 1846, the ‘Friends of a respectable young Woman’ placed this advertisement in the ‘Wants‘ column of Saunders’s News-Letter: The Friends of a respectable young Woman wish to procure for her a Situation either as Attendant on a Lady or in a Nursery, or as a Shop Girl; she is adequate to any of the above capacities, and is willing to make herself generally useful, being of an humble, quiet and obliging disposition; she is a good needleworker, and can teach

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The Top Ten Christmas Presents to Give in the 1920s

Imagine yourself back in December 1925, with Christmas fast approaching, in London where: All the pavements are alive this week with purchasers moving in ceaseless procession from window to window as they search for the particular Christmas gift for the particular person who is to receive it. They wander down street after street, for London nowadays is the finest city in which to purchase a gift – humble, rich, or rare – that the world knows. It’s time for Christmas

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Hot Off The Press – New Titles This Week

This week at The Archive is a very special one, as today on the 29 November 2021 we celebrate our tenth birthday! It is ten years since we launched the British Newspaper Archive, and to celebrate this decade of digitising newspapers, we have added ten brand new titles to our collection, as well as updating ten of our existing titles, numbering 114,064 brand new pages in all. So read on to find out more about all of our new ten titles, which hail from across England’s north

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