Search Results for “munitions workers” – The British Newspaper Archive Blog

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Far From ‘Idle:’ The Women Canal Workers of the Second World War

Nicknamed the ‘Idle Women,’ although they were about as far from idle as anybody could possibly be, the women canal workers of the Second World War performed vital war work which is all but forgotten today, some seventy years later. Some of the ‘Idle women’ arriving at a canal dock | The Sphere | 15 April 1944 The curious name of ‘Idle Women’ came from the badges that these pioneering women wore, with the initials ‘IW,’ which stood for ‘Inland Waterways’.

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Women munition workers in WW1 – an advert for work overalls and the opening of a hostel in Newcastle

‘Lady Parsons, in declaring the hostel open, wished it every success, and said it was an honour to open a home for the women engaged in munition works.’ We’re fascinated by all the newspaper reports about women munition workers during the First World War. In addition to all the news and personal stories, there are some terrific adverts for hiring workers (we always like to know how much money our ancestors were earning) and the clothes that they needed for

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Women munition workers in WW1 – an advert for overalls and the opening of a hostel in Newcastle

We’re fascinated by all the newspaper reports about women munition workers during the First World War. In addition to the news and personal stories, there are some terrific adverts for hiring workers (we always like to know how much money our ancestors were earning) and the clothes that they needed for their work, etc. Included below is an advert for the overalls that munition workers required, and also a story about the opening of a hostel in Newcastle in 1916

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‘Where the People Boat’ – A Look at the History of the Boating Lake

In May 1905, The Sphere reports how ‘A remarkable scene may be witnessed any Sunday on the big lake at Battersea Park where the people boat.’ And in the early twentieth century, this scene could be found at boating lakes in cities and towns across the country, providing in particular the working classes with leisure opportunities previously unknown to them. In this special blog, using articles and illustrations all to be found within the British Newspaper Archive, we are going to take

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Women and the First World War

First Worls War women firefighters

During the First World War (1914-1918), the role of women in Britain was massively altered and the women’s sphere was enlarged in every direction. Some historians mark the First World War as a watershed moment in women’s history when women were looked at less as fragile creatures and more as robust figures.  A single blog post is not enough to explore all the contributions of women during the Great War, but we have combed through The British Newspaper Archive and

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Tragedy and triumph in Warwick Davis’ family tree

  “I won’t be embarrassed by what I discover, bring it on! Let’s have an adventure.” – Warwick Davis In last night’s episode of Who Do You Think You Are? we joined Warwick Davis, best known for his acting career, as he uncovered a few family secrets including bigamy and multiple marriages on his mother’s side of the family, as well as tragedy and another successful performer on his father’s side. Searching for a Local Pub Warwick wanted to find out

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Policing Pioneers – A Look at the History of the Women’s Police Service

Upon the advent of the First World War a new organisation was formed – the Women Police Volunteers. Later known as the Women’s Police Service, these women played a vital role in paving the way for the establishment and acceptance of women in the police. Members of the Women’s Police Service at a Buckingham Palace Garden party | The Sphere | 2 April 1919 Although the inclusion of women in the police was discussed prior to the outbreak of the war, and

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Newspapers from the Pandemic – Reporting on the Spanish Flu

What began as rumours from Spain was soon to become a nightmarish reality, as the Spanish flu pandemic began to take hold in the United Kingdom, where it would go on to kill approximately 250,000 people, and 50,000,000 globally. Staff from the Michie Hospital | Graphic | 26 July 1919 In this special blog, as part of medicine month on The Archive, we will take a look at how newspapers from the time reported on the deadly disease, from those first rumours,

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Women and the Second World War

Continuing our commemoration of the 75 years since VE-Day, in this special blog we explore the vital role that women played throughout the course of the Second World War. In 1939, for a second time in just over twenty years, Britain found itself embroiled in an international conflict, and women stepped forward to work in civil defence, armed forces, and industry.  Unlike any other country, for the first time, British women were conscripted into service.  On 18 December 1941, the

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